Arts and Crafts

Arts & Crafts project
Exhibit Introduction

Requirements:
Check with your County Extension Office for your county's specific project offerings and requirements

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements



 
Level:All Levels
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit

According to county requirements. ** State Fair classes are offered as follows: Attach to project - 4-H-618A-W "4-H Craft Information Card" for description of work completed on the project.

If multiple pieces make up the exhibit, a photograph of the complete exhibit should be attached to the exhibit so the total exhibit can properly be displayed. For safety purposes any craft exhibit that resembles a sword, knife, or look-a-like weapon will be judged but will not be displayed.

  • Fine Arts - oil, charcoal, pastels, pencil, ink, acrylic or watercolor--on canvas, canvas board, or paper - framed as a picture - prepared for hanging.
  • Needle Craft - (Hand work) Knitting, embroidery, crocheting, needlepoint, crewel, candlewicking, chicken scratching, hand quilting, tatting, huck embroidery, hemstitching; also pulled, drawn and counted thread work and punch needle work. Does not include latch hook, plastic canvas, machine knitting or machine quilting.
  • Model Craft - A small-scale replica (no die casts) Lego built models go in Any Other Craft.
  • Any Other Craft - May not include any crafts included in the three classes listed above



Electric

The 4-H electricity/electronics program provides youth with educational information about electricity and how it can be used to benefit the human race. The electricity/electronics program develops project skills (i.e., safe practices, proper use of fuses and circuit breakers, proper lighting techniques, proper wiring techniques) and life skills (i.e., decision-making, using science and technology, developing communication skills). These fun-filled, hands-on learning experiences are provided under the direction of caring adults.
Requirements

 
Level:Division I
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Make a circuit board.
  2. Conduct a Hazard Hunt.
  3. Complete your record.
Exhibit

*Exhibit at your local or county fair a circuit board (using kit provided, label parallel or series circuit). "What I Have Done and Learned" is not required required for county only.




 
Level:Division II
Last Modified: 10/06/05
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Make a magnetic powered flashlight or exhibit a poster (22" x 28") on a topic described in the manual.
  2. Complete your record.
Exhibit

*Exhibit at your local or county fair either: magnetic powered flashlight or a poster (22" x 28") as outlined in the project manual or project CD.




 
Level:Division III
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Project Completion Recommendations


Check the circuits in your home
1. Make one of the following:

  1. Build an extension cord using all new parts
  2. Build an incandescent trouble light using all new parts
  3. Build a fluorescent trouble light using all new parts
  4. Repair an extension cord or trouble light by replacing the cord, plug, connector body or socket handle with a new part(s).
  5. Create a poster about
    • wire size
    • wire type
    • current carrying capacity
    • the parts of an extension cord or trouble light
    • an important safety-related topic
    • any topic covered in the Division III manual

      All poster exhibits are to be displayed horizontally, sized 22"x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other) and covered in clear plastic or transparent material. Place standard identification label with your name, grade and county in the lower right-hand corner of the poster.

2. Complete your record.
Note: For parameters on any of the above project options, see the Division III electric manual

Exhibit

*Exhibit at your local or county fair either: Extension cord; a trouble light or a poster as outlined in the project manual.




 
Level:Division IV
Last Modified: 09/01/06
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Complete the activities presented in the manual.
  2. Make or remake a lamp, or make a poster or display board on any topic covered in the manual
  3. Complete your record
Exhibit

*Exhibit one of the following at your local county fair.

  • Made or remade lamp
  • Display board on any topic covered in manual
  • Poster on any topic covered in this manual

All poster exhibits are to be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mount on a firm backing (foam-core board or other) and covered in clear plastic or transparent material. Place standard identification label with your name, grade and county in the lower right-hand corner of the poster.




 
Level:Advanced Division
Last Modified: 06/21/05
Project Completion Recommendations

Select one of the following areas for study:

Heating and cooling
Lighting
Electronics
Power
Consumer Buying
Better methods--electrically
Careers

Exhibit

*Exhibit at the local or county fair: One article made, a written report, a chart, a diagram or photographs that tell the story, as listed in project manual.

One article or unit of electronic equipment.




Foods

The "Fantastic Foods" curriculum series is designed to help youth have fun in the kitchen as they prepare different foods, do fun experiments, and go on fact-finding missions. The curriculum is designed around six major categories: healthy food selection, smart food purchasing, food safety and science, food preparation, food preservation, careers, and food around the world.

A total of five pieces are available in the series. The four youth activity guides: Six Easy Bites (grades 3-4), Tasty Tidbits (grades 5-6), You're the Chef (grades 7-9), and Foodworks (grades 10-12) have been designed to be developmentally appropriate for the grades listed; but may be used by youth in any grade based on their project skills and expertise. The fifth piece, the Project Helper Guide, has been designed to provide an adult, the guiding helper, with some additional background and some tips on helping youth through the activities in their guide.
Are you ready to do fun experiments, prepare flavor-filled recipes, and go on fact-finding missions? That is what "Fantastic Foods" series is all about. You will have fun learning about different food ingredients, food characteristics, and food safety issues.

Your project manual is divided into six "bites": Once You Swallow, Money Talks, Play It Safe, Kitchen Magic, Eat It Later, and Imagine That.

Exhibit Introduction

Members are required to complete a minimum three (3) activities, each from a different "bite" category each year they are in the project.

Project manual MUST accompany the exhibit (county level only).

Note to Extension Educators – Given the number of changes to the existing policy, it is suggested that staff remove this policy in its entirety from current documents and publications and insert the updated policy as stated below. This policy has been reviewed by Katherine E. Clayton, Food Science Extension Outreach Specialist.

For food competitions: Filling, frosting, glazing, pie filling, and meringue, (whether uncooked or cooked) are not permitted to contain cream cheese, sour cream, heavy cream, or whipped cream as the nature of these products increases the moisture content and water activity of the food. Foods with a higher moisture content and water activity can be ideal growing conditions for food borne pathogens, even if the ingredient is part of a batter and baked. Additionally, raw milk, raw milk products or uncooked eggs/egg whites are not permitted. Eggs/egg whites that have been cooked to 160°F (i.e. pasteurized or included as part of a batter and baked) are acceptable. No home-canned fruits, vegetables, or meats are permitted in products. Recipes must be provided that show which ingredients were used in each part of the product. Contestants should carefully wash their hands and make sure that their hands do not have any open cuts before preparing foods. Contestants should not be preparing food exhibits for competition within 48 hours of recovering from any illness. Whenever possible, baked products should be transported and stored in chilled coolers (41°F).

Judges and individuals who will consume products from county and state competitions should be informed that they are at risk for foodborne illness since the established policy cannot guarantee that an entry which may be a "potentially hazardous food" has been properly prepared or handled before, during or following the competition. Tasting of a food product is solely at the discretion of the judge. Judges are NOT to taste any low-acid or acidified preserved food, like green beans or tomato products, and are discouraged from tasting any other home preserved food.

Consumers of competitive food exhibits being sold at auction or used for hospitality purposes should be notified they could be at risk for foodborne illness since the established policy cannot guarantee that an entry which may be a “potentially hazardous food” has been properly prepared or handled before, during, or following the competition.

Purdue Extension Food Safety Policy
(revised 11/2013)

Instructions for preparing foods exhibits for display at State Fair (these instructions may be adapted for use in your county):
Labeling:

  1. Cover label with clear plastic wrap so that it will not become grease stained.
  2. Tape label to the paper plate or container before the product is wrapped.

Recipe or index cards:

  1. A recipe card or index card (no larger than 5 1/2" x 8 1/2") is required for all food exhibits.
    Be sure to include all the information requested in the exhibit description, as well as your name, county, and the dept.-section-class numbers. It is recommended that you wrap the card in plastic wrap or in a plastic bag. Recipe cards will not be returned.
  2. Since it is illegal in the State of Indiana for youth under the age of 21 to purchase or consume alcoholic beverages, 4-H members are to use recipes that do not include an alcoholic beverage as an ingredient. A suitable non-alcoholic or imitation product may be substituted.

How to prepare products for display.

  1. Most food products should be displayed on a paper or foam plate.
  2. For cakes - cut a piece of cardboard about 1/2 inch larger than the bottom of the cake. Cover this cardboard with wax paper, plastic wrap, or foil before putting the cake on it.
  3. Any other product that may be sticky on the bottom, such as some fancy breads, should be put on round, square, or rectangle cardboard. Cover this cardboard with wax paper, plastic wrap, or foil before putting the food product on it.
  4. Frozen food exhibits (containers and food) will not be returned to the exhibitor. Please display in freezer bags or disposable freezer containers.
  5. Pies should be exhibited in disposable pie tin.
  6. All canned products must have the ring on the jar top to protect the seal.

 



Requirements

 
Level:Level A Grade 3 (First year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • Six drop, molded or bar baked cookies, no glaze or frosting. Include recipe card.
  • A package of 6 baked frozen cookies. Display in freezer bag or freezer container. (NOTE: Freezer containers will not be returned.) Include index card with recipe and instructions for defrosting. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
  • An action interactive demonstration.



 
Level:Level A Grade 4 (Second Year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • Six muffins of any kind (no muffin liners). Include recipe card.
  • One package of frozen berries. Display in freezer bag or freezer container. (NOTE: Freezer containers will not be returned.) Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking or defrosting. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
  • An action interactive demonstration.



 
Level:Level B Grade 5 (First year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • A square, oblong or round layer of cake without frosting. Include recipe card.
  • One uncooked frozen mini-pizza using pita bread, english muffin, bagel, or already prepared crust (no larger than 7" in diameter) with toppings of your choice. Meat toppings such as hamburger, sausage, bacon, etc. need to be cooked. Display on covered cardboard inside freezer bag. Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
  • An action interactive demonstration.



 
Level:Level B Grade 6 (Second Year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • Six no-yeast, any shape pretzels (shaped, stick, or nugget) OR 6 no-yeast rolled biscuits (no drop biscuits.) Include recipe card.
  • One package of any frozen vegetable or combination vegetables. Display in freezer bag or freezer container. (NOTE: Freezer containers will not be returned.) Include index card with instructions for cooking. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
  • An action interactive demonstration.



 
Level:Level C Grade 7 (First year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • Six yeast breadsticks or yeast rolls (any shape, medium size -- not a sweet roll). Include recipe card.
  • One container of freezer jam. Include index card with recipe and instructions for storing. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
  • An action interactive demonstration.



 
Level:Level C Grade 8 (Second Year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • A yeast bread (can be loaf, braid, but not rolls) using a specialty grain such as whole wheat, rye, oat bran, etc. or a yeast sweet bread such as tea ring. Include recipe card.
  • One jar of a canned tomato product using the Hot Pack Method for a boiling water bath canner, such as tomato juice, catsup, barbecue sauce, or salsa. Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking or using the product. Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned.
  • An action interactive demonstration



 
Level:Level C Grade 9 (Third Year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • One package of a non-perishable invented snack (such as a granola bar, brownie, fudge, fruit leather, popcorn snack, trail mix, etc) or another invented food product. Exhibit must include a separate folder containing a marketing plan with product name, recipe, how it will be packaged, a package design, where it will be sold and suggested selling price. Label should include product name, date, quantity, and serving size.
  • One jar of a canned pickled product or canned pickles. Include index card with recipe, processing, and storage instructions. (Products using a fancy pack are not accepted.) Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned.
  • An action interactive demonstration.



 
Level:Level D Grade 10 (First Year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • A single or double crust baked fruit pie* (no graham cracker crust).Include recipe card.
    (Note: Custards, cream, cream cheese frosting and fillings, and raw egg white frosting are not acceptable in an exhibit because they are highly perishable when left at room temperatures.)
  • One jar of pressure canned vegetables, meat or combination product, such as soup, stew, spaghetti sauce with meat, etc. Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking or using the product. (Products using a fancy pack are not accepted.) Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned.
  • An action interactive demonstration.



 
Level:Level D Grade 11 (Second Year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • A non-perishable baked international food product ( such as apple strudel, French bread, Mexican wedding cakes, fortune cookies, etc.) with a separate page describing the food customs of a country and how the food product is used in relation to that country's customs or a table display on a country outlining food preferences, meal patterns, how nutritional needs are met, interesting customs, traditions, etc. Display should be no larger than 16" deep x 22" wide x 28" high. Include index card with recipe. (Note: Custards, cream, cream cheese frosting and fillings, and raw egg white frosting are not acceptable in an exhibit because they are highly perishable when left at room temperatures.)
  • One package of a frozen entree such as a casserole, hearty soup or vegetable dish in freezer container. Exhibit should include an index card with recipe and instructions for reheating. Display in disposable containers. No containers will be returned. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
  • An action interactive demonstration



 
Level:Level D Grade 12 (Third Year)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit
  • A non-perishable baked food product* for a special occasion or catered meal (such as an appetizer, holiday food, fruit cake, special occasion cake, altered recipe product, etc.) with a separate page outlining how this product is to be used at the event, or a table display for a special occasion or catered meal. The display should include a notebook outlining menu, supplies to buy, preparation schedule, equipment, table layout, etc. Display should be no larger than 16" deep x 22" wide x 28" high. Include index card with recipe.
  • A jar of cooked jelly or a reduced sugar fruit spread. Include recipe card. Label with name of product, quantity, and date made.
  • An action interactive demonstration.



Genealogy

Educational materials on "How to" information on documenting ones heritage through ancestral listing. The project can be done as an individual or group with a parent or grandparent. It helps young people know where their ancestors resided, traveled, and developed some family tradition.
Exhibit Introduction

Forms for this project are found on the Indiana 4-H Web site www.four-h.purdue.edu click on "projects" and then on Genealogy to reach downloadable forms. This project is organized into divisions and not grades for a youth cannot start in Division 3 without first completing Division 1 and Division 2. This is a project that builds on the previous division information in order to be successful in building your family tree. If you are using a genealogical commercial software program, you may need to type in or hand write in information required by the Indiana 4-H genealogy project. See 4-H forms on the 4-H website linked above. Since the current year's exhibit builds on the previous year’s data collection, only the current year's data collection is required for exhibition.

So the notebook exhibit can be displayed to the public and to minimize the potential of identity theft, original legal documents are NOT to be included in the exhibit notebook. Instead, a photocopy of any legal document is to be included in the notebook and all identifiable information (like social security numbers) except for names is to be completely marked out. Original legal documents are to be kept in a secure location by the 4-H member and his/her family.



Requirements

 
Level:Division 1
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • An Introduction page with a recent photograph of yourself.
    • Completed three-generation pedigree chart. This includes you, your parents, and your grandparents, ancestors #1 through #7. Put all surnames in capital letters and all dates in military form (12 July 1974). Give each person a number, as described in the "Recording the Information" section of the Indiana 4-H Genealogy Resource Guide 4-H 748. You must use the pedigree charts listed at the four-h.purdue.edu, 4-H 748Pc-W or 4-H 748Pbw-W or the commercial software forms, but not the old "packet" pedigree charts.
    • A Family Group Sheet for your parents and each pair of grandparents. Sources of information must be filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information").
    • Four (4) "Additional Information Worksheets":
      • one(1) for you, the 4-H member
      • one (1) for your parents
      • one (1) for each set of grandparents (total = two worksheets)
    • Any documents or pictures pertaining to these three generations. Documents must be labeled with ancestor name and ancestor number. Pictures need to be labeled with ancestor name, plus names of all known people, place and date picture was taken, as well as ancestor numbers.
    • A diary of your work.
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet.



Forms for this project are found on the Indiana 4-H Web site www.four-h.purdue.edu click on "projects" and then on Genealogy to reach downloadable forms. This project is organized into divisions and not grades for a youth cannot start in Division 3 without first completing Division 1 and Division 2. This is a project that builds on the previous division information in order to be successful in building your family tree. If you are using a genealogical commercial software program, you may need to type in or hand write in information required by the Indiana 4-H genealogy project. See 4-H forms on the 4-H website linked above.

Level:Division 2
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • Four-generation pedigree chart. This would include you, your parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents, ancestors #1 through #15. You must use the pedigree charts listed at four-h.purdue.edu, 4-H 748Pc-W or 4-H 748Pbw-W or the commercial software forms, but not the old "packet" pedigree charts
    • A Family Group Sheet for each pair of great-grandparents. Sources of information filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information" in the Indiana 4-H Genealogy Resource Guide 4-H 748).
    • An additional information worksheet for each set of great grandparents.
    • Any photographs taken of tombstones of your ancestors and their children. Please document location of tombstone(s) and label with ancestor name, ancestor number, and date photo was taken. Rubbings are acceptable in lieu of photographs.
    • Any other documents or pictures pertaining to these generations, correctly labeled.
    • A diary of your work.
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet.



Forms for this project are found on the Indiana 4-H Web site www.four-h.purdue.edu click on "projects" and then on Genealogy to reach downloadable forms. This project is organized into divisions and not grades for a youth cannot start in Division 3 without first completing Division 1 and Division 2. This is a project that builds on the previous division information in order to be successful in building your family tree. If you are using a genealogical commercial software program, you may need to type in or hand write in information required by the Indiana 4-H genealogy project. See 4-H forms on the 4-H website linked above.

Level:Division 3
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • Five-generation pedigree chart as in Division I, ancestors #1 through #31. Computer programs do not generally print chart numbers, so if you are using a computer program, make sure you have the correct number of ancestors. If an ancestor is UNKNOWN, please indicate as UNKNOWN. You must use the pedigree charts listed at four-h.purdue.edu, 4-H 748Pc-W or 4-H 748Pbw-W, or the commercial software forms, but not the old "packet" pedigree charts
    • Additional Family Group Sheets and information worksheets for generation five (5). Sources of information must be filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information" in Indiana 4-H Genealogy Resource Guide 4-H 748.).
    • Write an autobiography, the story of your life. Include pictures, relevant dates, and important events. OR, write an essay about what your hopes and dreams are for the future, or about life goals you hope to attain.
    • Any documents or pictures pertaining to these generations, correctly labeled.
    • A diary of your work.
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet.



 
Level:Division 4
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • Six-generation pedigree charts as in Division I, ancestors #1 through #63.Computer programs do not generally print chart numbers, so if you are using a computer program, make sure you have the correct number of ancestors. You must use the pedigree charts listed at four-h.purdue.edu, 4-H 748Pc-W or 4-H 748Pbw-W, or the commercial software forms, but not the old "packet" pedigree charts
    • Additional Family Group Sheets and information worksheets for generation six (6). Sources of information must be filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information").
    • A copy of a photograph or a story of a sixth-generation ancestor. Include information about the date when the photograph was taken, how or where you found it and what's happening in it or why it was taken. If this is unavailable, write a story about the historical period during which your sixth generation ancestor was living.
    • Any documents or pictures pertaining to these generations, correctly labeled.
    • A diary of your work.
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet



 
Level:Advanced Division
Last Modified: 11/21/07
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • Eight-generation pedigree charts, ancestors through # 255. Computer programs do not generally print chart numbers, so if you are using a computer program, make sure you have the correct number of ancestors.
    • Your family group sheet and additional information worksheets for generations seven and eight.
    • Sources of information filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information" in the Indiana 4-H Genealogy Resource Guide, 4-H 748).
    • One advanced level option (see below).
    • Any documents or pictures pertaining to these generations; correctly labeled.
    • A diary of your work
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet.

    Pedigree charts are available on the Indiana 4-H Web site for your additional genealogy research. Each year following, continue to add ancestors to your pedigree charts. In addition, choose one of the following options that has not been completed previously. Please identify, by letter, the option that you are completing (for example: Advanced Division, Year 1, Option A; Advanced Division, Year 2, Option C; etc.)

    1. A migration map of your eight-generation ancestors. You should have at least one map per family line with charts or explanations of the migrations.

    2. A timeline historical report of a family line. Show how this family fits into history. Document your report as well as possible with dates, records, places or maps, pictures, etc. Be sure to include proper labels and sources.

    3. A census history of a family line. Census abstract forms can be found on several websites. Download forms to abstract the census. Your notebook should contain copies of the census and the completed abstract form for each census.

    4. A history of your family's religious background for any family line or lines. Include a brief history of the denomination. Include baptism, confirmation or profession of faith and membership records. Also include information or history of the congregations involved. Be sure to include proper labels and sources.

    5. A history of your family's military service for a family line. Include supporting documents when possible. These documents could include military records, (muster rolls, discharge papers, etc.), pension records, and bounty land records, as well as maps and pictures. Be sure to include proper labels and sources.

    6. A research paper on a famous ancestor. Prove your relationship to this person with documentation. Try to include pictures and anecdotes to enhance your paper.

    7. Complete a family line or lines back as many generations as possible beyond eight generations. Include pictures, maps and documents. Be sure to include proper labels and sources.

    8. A timeline historical report of another family line not previously completed. Document as well as possible as in Option B. You need to state at the beginning that this is a second family historical report on such ancestor.

    9. A history of your family's military service for a family line not previously completed. Include supporting documents as in Option E. You need to state at the beginning that this is a second family military history report on such ancestor.

    10. Family DNA history. (This can be a very expensive option) Please include charts and explanations.




Home Environment

Educational materials applying principles of design to home design and decoration as well as information about care of home furnishings.
Exhibit Introduction

For the 4-H Home Environment project, 4-H members at each grade level may choose from three possible exhibit categories: a furniture item and notebook, a design board (poster and notebook), or a portfolio (notebook). All exhibits must include the Home Environment Exhibit Card, 4-H-1011-D-W. Level 3 participants will also have a fourth choice: independent study. NOTE: Each level has several options per category from which to choose. We suggest that 4-H members either choose a different option each year or show how they expanded on the same option (portfolio and furniture categories only) used in previous years.

Categories
Furniture Item and Notebook -- An actual piece of furniture accompanied by a standard notebook (3-ring binder) explaining the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the chosen project. We suggest including pictures showing where the item will be used. Also, we encourage 4-H members to include pictures of themselves doing the project, but this is not required. Always place your identification information in the notebook and on the furniture.

Design Board and notebook -- standard 22" x 28" poster, displayed horizontally with a firm backing. Design boards must be covered with plastic to protect and help hold items in place. An identification name tag must be attached in the lower right corner. The notebook is to help explain the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the chosen design. This can be a "before and after project" or "plan in the future" project.

Portfolio -- standard notebook (3-ring binder). If 4-H members choose to do this option more than one year, we suggest that they keep the previous year's materials in the notebook. Place materials for the current year in the front, with the previous year's materials clearly marked or labeled at the back. Always place your identification information in the notebook.

Other information:
Color samples -- These can be paint samples from a paint or hardware store, or color samples the 4-H member makes with paints or colored pencils.

Other samples -- Many hardware or home improvement stores have free samples of wall coverings, flooring, countertops, and cabinet materials that can be used with the 4-H member's design board or portfolio.

Colored pencils -- We suggest using colored pencils when coloring the design board or portfolio. Colored pencils are what professionals use! Keep in mind that the entire area does not need to be colored in, but be sure to apply enough color to adequately express design ideas. Other methods for coloring will also be accepted. These could include (but are not limited to): crayons, watercolor pencils, markers, or printing on the computer.



Requirements

 
Level:Level 1: Grades 3 - 5 (two State Fair exhibits from this level)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit

Manual: 4-H 1011 Home Environment: Color, Texture, Line, and Shape.

Furniture Options for Level 1
Exhibit any of the following items demonstrating color, texture, and/or line and shape that would help complete a room. Include your notebook. (See "Furniture Item and Notebook" explanation above.)

  • A hanging or wall hanging item.
  • A storage item or organizer item for room or the home.
  • 3 - 5 accessory items for your chosen room.

Design Board Options for Level 1

  • Color the line drawing found in 4-H 1011 Home Environment manual titled Color, Texture, Line, and Shape with colored pencils. Print a line drawing from the options available on the Indiana 4-H website: www.four-h.purdue.edu look under "projects" and then Home Environment. Create three different color schemes for the line drawing you have chosen. Label the type of color scheme used in each (e.g., monochromatic, analogous, complementary, warm, or cool). Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Color the line drawing found in 4-H 1011 Home Environment manual titled Color, Texture, Line, and Shape using one color option. Line drawings can be printed from the Indiana 4-H website: www.four-h.purdue.edu look under "projects" and then Home Environment. Use color to explain dominant and supportive colors. Attach color samples to identify two additional color options. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan for a bedroom showing line and shape where furniture would be placed (could be your own). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. We suggest using graph paper to help get the drawing close to scale and to show how line and shape work with the furniture. Include your 3-ring notebook.

Portfolio Options for Level 1

  • Collect samples of different color schemes (minimum of three), and label the type represented by each (e.g., monochromatic, analogous, complementary, warm, or cool).
  • Collect samples from magazines or photographs of formal vs. informal balance, dominant and supportive color, and use of pattern. Include comments explaining each.
  • Collect samples from magazines of three different furniture designs. Label each style (e.g., traditional, modern, country, formal, or retro). Include information explaining each style.



 
Level:Level 2: Grades 6-8 (two State Fair exhibits from this level)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit

Manual: Home Environment: Design Decisions (University of Nebraska). This one manual is to be used for grades 6 - 12 as a resource and a reference. Indiana 4-H exhibit options are not listed in the University of Nebraska manual. You are referred to the Indiana 4-H Youth Development website: www.four-h.purdue.edu or your local county 4-H handbook for exhibit option details.

Furniture Options for Level 2
Exhibit any of the following items demonstrating color, texture, and/or line and shape that would help complete a room. Include your notebook. (See "Furniture Item and Notebook" explanation above.)

  • One piece of furniture the 4-H member has refinished.
  • One piece of furniture the 4-H member has changed using decoupage, paint, fabric, etc.
  • One cushion or one 2-piece set of cushions, preferably made by the 4-H member, displayed with intended furniture
  • One window treatment, including picture of the treatment in use. (Should not be displayed on an actual window; use false walls or plywood no-glass window cutouts, or make special display rods.)
  • One piece of furniture that the 4-H member has reupholstered.
  • One item that you are using for a different purpose than it was originally designed for (e.g., bedsheet used to make a window treatment, drawer used as a wall shelf).
  • A collection of 3-5 similar items (baskets, wicker items, wicker furniture, bentwood furniture, etc.)  that you have made and/or purchased for future use.  (For example a collection of baskets made to use as desk accessories or bathroom accessories, outdoor furniture and accessories, etc.)

Design Board Options for Level 2

  • Display a floor plan for a living room, den, or family room. Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. We suggest using graph paper to help get the drawing close to scale and to show where the furniture would be placed. Include paint samples and/or wall-treatment samples. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan for a full bathroom (toilet, sink, and shower and/or bathtub). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the fixtures that would be used. We suggest using graph paper to help get the drawing close to scale and to show where the fixtures would go. Include paint samples and/or wall-treatment samples, and flooring samples. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan for a kitchen (including appliances and sink). Include pictures (magazine, appliance brochure, or photographs). We suggest using graph paper to help get the drawing close to scale and to show where the fixtures would go. Include paint samples and/or wall-treatment samples, flooring samples, and cabinet and/or countertop samples. Include your 3-ring notebook.

Portfolio Options for Level 2

  • Samples of three different types of wall treatments with an explanation for each. Examples can include but are not limited to: paint only, wallpaper only, or combination of paint and wallpaper.
  • Samples of three different floor treatments (pictures or flooring samples). Examples can include but are not limited to: hardwood, carpet, and/or tile. Include information on the advantages and disadvantages of each. Also include information on where it would be appropriate to use each flooring type.
  • Samples of three different cabinet/countertop combinations (pictures or samples). Examples can include but are not limited to: granite, laminate, and/or stainless steel. Include information about the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • An energy-savings plan. Design an energy-savings plan for your family's home or room(s). List the current energy use along with your plan to conserve energy. Plan should include techniques, how to conserve energy, cost savings, etc. You may add additional rooms or other plans to extend this option over a few years. Include each previous year's work, but be sure that you indicate which information represents the current year's work.



 
Level:Level 3: Grades 9 - 12 (two State Fair exhibits from this level)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit

Manual: Home Environment: Design Decisions (University of Nebraska). This one manual is to be used for grades 6–12 as a resource and a reference. Indiana 4-H exhibit options are not listed in the University of Nebraska manual. You are referred to the Indiana 4-H Youth Development website: www.four-h.purdue.edu or your local county 4-H handbook for exhibit option details.

Furniture Options for Level 3
Exhibit any of the following items demonstrating color, texture, and/or line and shape that would help complete your room along with your notebook. (See "Furniture Item and Notebook" explanation above.)

  • One piece of furniture the 4-H member has refinished.
  • One piece of furniture the 4-H member has changed using decoupage, paint, fabric, etc.
  • One cushion or one 2-piece set of cushions, preferably made by the 4-H member, displayed with intended furniture
  • One window treatment, including picture of the treatment in use. (Should not be displayed on an actual window; use false walls or plywood no-glass window cutouts, or make special display rods.)
  • One piece of furniture that the 4-H member has reupholstered.
  • One item that you are using for a different purpose than it was originally designed for (e.g., bedsheet used to make a window treatment, drawer used as a wall shelf).
  • A collection of 3-5 similar items (baskets, wicker items, wicker furniture, bentwood furniture, etc.)  that you have made and/or purchased for future use.  (For example a collection of baskets made to use as desk accessories or bathroom accessories, outdoor furniture and accessories, etc.)

Design Board Options for Level 3

  • Display a floor plan for a child's or teen's bedroom. Include a special "theme" appropriate for a child or teen (e.g., princess, cartoon character, music group, favorite book, or special hobby). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. Floor plan should be to scale with general measurements included. Include samples of window, wall, and flooring treatments. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan for a game room or family hobby room (e.g., room with pool table, ping pong table, and/or game table; home theater; or music room). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. Floor plan should be to scale with general measurements included. Include samples of window, wall, and flooring treatments. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan of master suite (bedroom and bath). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. Floor plan should be to scale with general measurements included. Include samples of window, wall, and flooring treatments, etc. This exhibit must also include fabric samples (e.g., bedspread, window treatment). Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan of a one- or two-bedroom home or apartment. Include color scheme samples and furniture layouts. Floor plan should be to scale with general measurements included. Window, wall, and flooring treatment samples should be included for each room. (Pictures of furniture are not a requirement.) Include your 3-ring notebook.

Portfolio Options for Level 3

  • Samples of three different lighting treatments. Explain how and when each is appropriate for use. Examples include but are not limited to: overhead, recessed, and table/floor lamps. Include information as it relates to energy use and efficiency.
  • Samples of three different types of window treatments. Include information on the use of each kind and in what room each would be appropriate. Include information on the advantages/disadvantages of each. Also, include information as it relates to energy use and efficiency.
  • Using the same window (size and shape), apply three different types of window treatments. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of each. Explain what type of setting (formal, country, traditional, modern, etc.) would be appropriate for each treatment. Include information related to energy use and efficiency.
  • A career plan. Interview an interior designer. Include the advantages and disadvantages of being a professional interior designer. Research two different design schools or training programs. Include the advantages and disadvantages of each program. Include the cost of attaining a degree or completing the program.
  • An energy-savings plan. Design an energy-savings plan for your family's home or room(s). List the current energy use along with your plan to conserve energy. Plan should include techniques, how to conserve energy, cost savings, etc. You may add additional rooms or other plans to extend this option over a few years. Include each previous year's work, but be sure that you indicate which information represents the current year's work.

Independent Study Option for Level 3
Youth in grades 9 - 12 have the option of doing an independent study project. Those 4-H members who choose this option must review their ideas with their 4-H Youth Development Extension Educator and/or Home Environment project leader to make sure they have selected an appropriate topic/exhibit.




Llamas (Llamas alpacas)

The 4-H Llama Project (Llama & Alpacas) provides youth a fun and hands-on learning experience that develops life skills, as well as teaches valuable information about properly caring for their animal. An important objective of this project is for the 4-H member to experience the pride of owning / leasing a lLlama or alpaca, gaining it's trust and being responsible for its care. The 4-H project books are organized into the following five subjects:
  1. Know Your Llama: History, Background, and Characteristics;
  2. Anatomy: Structure / Conformation, Fiber, and Parts;
  3. Health, Maintenance and Facilities;
  4. Training and Showing;
  5. Use, Marketing, and Careers.
Youth also have the opportunity to develop responsibility, decision-making, nurturing, and communication skills through active participation in the 4-H Llama Project. In addition to owning / leasing a lLlama or alpaca, 4-H members can also participate in the Llama Poster project and the Llama Craft projects.


Requirements

 
Level:For all levels
Last Modified: 10/01/13
  • Llama Exhibition Classes

All Llamas and alpacas must be enrolled on the online animal enrollment system by May 15 to be eligible to participate in the Indiana State Fair Llama and Alpaca show. Contact your county extension office regarding county animal enrollment requirements.

  • Llama Poster Educational Exhibit
    • Posters will be judged on theme, construction, style and language. Posters must have been constructed within one (1) year of exhibit and must follow general state poster guidelines
    • Each poster must have been made by the 4-H member enrolled in the current year's 4-H program.
    • Size - 22" x 28", displayed horizontally with stiff backing and covered with plastic accompanied by a name tag in the lower front right hand corner.
    • Standards of evaluation:
      • content and information (accuracy and completeness) - 40 points
      • originality and creativity (attracts interest, encourages thought) - 25 points
      • overall appearance/appealing (neatness, arrangement, background, workmanship, attention to detail) - 15 points
      • suitable subject and age appropriate (matches child's age and ability) - 10 points
      • conveys message/accomplishes purpose - 5 points
      • meets exhibit requirements - 5 points
      • Total - 100 points
  • Llama Craft Exhibit
    • Llama/Alpaca Fiber Crafts - Exhibit will be judged on craftsmanship only. Crafts must have been made within one (1) year of exhibit. Any craft item constructed with llama or alpaca fiber may be entered. Craft may also contain other materials. Fiber may be processed (felted, spun, etc.) or unprocessed, and may be originated from any llama or alpaca. Exhibits will consist of one (1) completed craft item, which can be a single item or a set, and a notebook explaining how the craft was made.



Shooting Sports

The 4-H shooting sports project teaches safe operation of firearms and archery equipment. Volunteer instructors must be certified at a workshop. Six disciplines are offered at the state level: archery, hunting, muzzle loading, pistol, rifle, and shotgun. The disciplines offered in any county will depend on the availability of certified 4-H shooting sports instructors to teach the classes, ranges, and equipment.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in shooting sports education this year. Exhibits must be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other), and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Be sure to include a label with your name, grade, and county. Title your exhibit with one of the following: archery, hunting, muzzleloading, pistol, rifle, shotgun, or shooting sports. You can use a subtitle, if you wish.

Important Notes: