Aerospace

The 4-H aerospace program provides youth with educational information about aerospace that develops project skills (i.e., principles of flight, model rocket construction, model rocket safety) and life skills (i.e., decision-making, using science and technology, developing communication skills). These fun-filled, hands-on learning experiences are provided under the direction of caring adults.
Exhibit Introduction

Each county would be permitted to send one rocket and one poster/display board in each grade category (3-5, 6-8, and 9-12). Thus each county could send a maximum of six exhibits to the state fair, 3 rockets and 3 poster/display boards. No "Ready to Fly" or E2X rockets are acceptable in the 4-H Aerospace project.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements



 
Level:(Grades K-2)
Last Modified: 10/01/05
Project Completion Recommendations
State Exhibit Requirements
No State Requirements



 
Level:(Grades 3-5) Stage 2
Last Modified: 10/06/05
Project Completion Recommendations
Complete the activities as indicated in the manual
State Exhibit Requirements
Rocket of your choice, Estes Skills Level 1, 2, 3 or comparable difficulty or a poster, display board on any topic in the manual(i.e., construct a paper airplane with a poster board explaining why you designed it the way you did)



 
Level:(Grades 6-8) Stage 3
Last Modified: 10/06/05
Project Completion Recommendations
Complete the activities as indicated in the manual
State Exhibit Requirements
Rocket or other aerodynamic object of your choice, Estes Skills Level 2, 3, 4, or comparable difficulty or poster, display board on any topic in the manual (i.e., glider plane (page 18) with poster explaining design)



 
Level:(Grades 9-12) Stage 4
Last Modified: 10/04/05
Project Completion Recommendations
Complete the activities as indicated in the manual
State Exhibit Requirements
Rocket of your choice, Box kite or other aerodynamic object of your choice which illustrates principles of flight. Note: Rockets must be a skill level 2 or higher or poster, display board on any topic in the manual (i.e., box kite (page 20) with poster explanation)



Arts and Crafts

Arts & Crafts project
Exhibit Introduction

Requirements:
Check with your County Extension Office for your county's specific project offerings and requirements

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements



 
Level:All Levels
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit

According to county requirements. ** State Fair classes are offered as follows: Attach to project - 4-H-618A-W "4-H Craft Information Card" for description of work completed on the project.

If multiple pieces make up the exhibit, a photograph of the complete exhibit should be attached to the exhibit so the total exhibit can properly be displayed. For safety purposes any craft exhibit that resembles a sword, knife, or look-a-like weapon will be judged but will not be displayed.

  • Fine Arts - oil, charcoal, pastels, pencil, ink, acrylic or watercolor--on canvas, canvas board, or paper - framed as a picture - prepared for hanging.
  • Needle Craft - (Hand work) Knitting, embroidery, crocheting, needlepoint, crewel, candlewicking, chicken scratching, hand quilting, tatting, huck embroidery, hemstitching; also pulled, drawn and counted thread work and punch needle work. Does not include latch hook, plastic canvas, machine knitting or machine quilting.
  • Model Craft - A small-scale replica (no die casts) Lego built models go in Any Other Craft.
  • Any Other Craft - May not include any crafts included in the three classes listed above



Beekeeping

This project will help you learn about bees and beekeeping. You will learn about the types of bees, the honey and wax they produce, the plants that attract bees, and the equipment a beekeeper needs. If you want to set up your own hive, you'll learn basic beehive care, how to extract and bottle honey. Advanced topics include: increasing the number of your honey bee colonies, increasing honey production, producing special kinds of honey, and learning more about bee societies.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the beekeeping project this year. Posters are to be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other), and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Choose one of the topics listed below, appropriate for your grade in school, and use that topic for your exhibit title, so the judges know which activity you completed. You can also use a creative sub-title if you wish.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.

Notes:

Requirements

 
Level:Division 1: (may do 1 to 2 years) 4-H 571, One State Fair entry per county
Last Modified: 10/01/09
Exhibit

Present one of the following topics on a poster, as specified above.

  1. Flowers Used to Make Honey - display pressed flowers from 10 different Indiana plants that bees use for making honey.
  2. Uses of Honey and Beeswax
  3. Setting up a Bee Hive
  4. Safe Handling of Bees



 
Level:Division 2: (may do 1 to 2 years) 4-H 586. There is no limit on the number of exhibits a county may enter in Division 2, but only one exhibit per 4-H member is allowed at the State Fair.
Last Modified: 09/21/07
Exhibit

Exhibit one of the following:

  1. Extracted honey - 2 one-pound jars, shown in glass or clear plastic, screw-top jars holding 1 pound of honey each.
  2. Chunk honey (comb in jar)- 2 one-pound jars(>wide-mouth glass or clear plastic).
  3. Cut-comb honey - 2 one- pound boxes (These are usually 4 1/2" x 4 1/2" in size)
  4. Working with Honey Bees - Present a topic from your manual to teach fair goers about working with honey bees. Use your knowledge and creativity to display this information on a poster or in a notebook. Posters must follow the guidelines listed above.



 
Level:Division 3 and Above: (may do multiple years) 4-H 593. There is no limit to the number of exhibits a county may enter in Division 3 and above, but only one exhibit per member is allowed at the State Fair.
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Exhibit

Exhibit two of the four kinds of honey listed below (#1-4) or prepare an educational display about honey bees or beekeeping (#5).

  1. Extracted Honey - 2 one-pound jars (glass or clear plastic).
  2. Chunk Honey (comb in jar) - 2 one-pound jars (wide-mouth - glass or clear plastic).
  3. Cut-comb Honey - 2 one-pound boxes. Boxes are usually 4 1/2" x 4 1/2"
  4. Comb Honey - 2 sections (honey built by bees in frames of wood commonly called "sections." Boxes are usually 4 1/2" x 4 1/2" in size)
  5. Prepare an educational display about honey bees or beekeeping.



 
Level:Independent Study: Grades 9 - 12, one State Fair entry
Last Modified: 10/14/09
Exhibit
  • Advanced topic - Learn all you can about a beekeeping topic and present it on a poster. Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the works cited to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster, "Advanced Beekeeping - Independent Study."
  • Mentoring - Exhibit a poster that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Advanced Beekeeping - Mentor."



Child Development

Uses instructional materials that deal with young children at different ages (i.e., infants, toddlers, pre-school) and baby-sitting. Characteristics of various ages are studied and followed by observations and interactive activities.
Exhibit Introduction

Here are details for each exhibit option:
Poster:

Binder notebook:

Display:

 



Requirements

 
Level:Level A (grades 3-4)
Last Modified: 10/01/05
Suggested Learning Experiences

4-H members should complete at least three activities, each from a different chapter. Within the two-year period for each level, they should have completed at least six activities, and at least one activity from each of the five chapters

Exhibit

Choose one of the following to exhibit.

  1. Choose one activity that you completed in this level. Design a 22 x 28-inch poster or a binder notebook that shows or tells what you did with this activity.
  2. Create a display no larger than 36 x 36 x 36 inches using one of the activities from your project manual. Complete an Activity Card and attach it to the exhibit. A sample Activity Card is on page 40. Use a 5 x 8 index card or larger cardstock to create your card.



 
Level:Level B (grades 5-6)
Last Modified: 10/04/05
Suggested Learning Experiences

4-H members should complete at least three activities, each from a different chapter. Within the two-year period for each level, they should have completed at least six activities, and at least one activity from each of the five chapters.

Exhibit

Choose one of the following to exhibit.

  1. Choose one activity that you completed in this level. Design a 22 x 28-inch poster or a binder notebook that shows or tells what you did with this activity.
  2. Create a display no larger than 36 x 36 x 36 inches using one of the activities from your project manual. Complete an Activity Card and attach it to the exhibit. A sample Activity Card is on page 40. Use a 5 x 8 index card or larger cardstock to create your card.




 
Level:Level C (grades 7, 8, 9)
Last Modified: 10/10/08
Suggested Learning Experiences

4-H members should complete at least three activities each year, each from a different chapter. Within the three-year period for each level, they should have completed at least nine activities, and at least one activity from each of the five chapters.

Exhibit
  1. Design a 22 x 28 inch poster based on one of the activities you completed in your manual or one that promotes physical, emotional or cognitive skills.
  2. Display a binder notebook that includes the information from one of the activities you completed this year.
  3. Create a display no larger than 36 x 36 x 36 inches using one of the activities from your project manual or one that promotes physical, emotional or cognitive skills. Complete an Activity Card and attach it to the exhibit. A sample Activity Card is on page 40. Use a 5 x 8 index card or larger cardstock to create your card.




 
Level:Level D (Grades 10, 11, 12)
Last Modified: 10/10/08
Suggested Learning Experiences

4-H members should complete at least three activities each year, each from a different chapter. Within the three-year period for each level, they should have completed at least nine activities, and at least one activity from each of the five chapters.

Exhibit

Choose one of the following to exhibit.

  1. Design a 22 x 28 inch poster based on one activity you completed in your manual or one that promotes physical, emotional, or cognitive skills.
  2. Display a binder notebook that includes the information based one of the activities you completed this year.
  3. Create a display no larger than 36 x 36 x 36 inches using one of the activities from your project manual or one that promotes physical, emotional, or cognitive skills. Complete an Activity Card and attach it to the exhibit. A sample Activity Card is on page 40. Use a 5 x 8 index card or larger cardstock to create your card.



Computer

Computer Project
Exhibit Introduction
  1. While youth are encouraged to develop programs that can be published either on the web or via CD, publishing the program is NOT a requirement or an expectation
  2. The exhibit topics provide ideas/suggestions for exhibits. Other exhibit topics are acceptable as long as they are comparable in knowledge and skill.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements

 
Level:Level 1 (Suggested for youth in grades 3 - 5 or open for no more than three years to 4-H members who feel they are capable of meeting the exhibit requirements of the project.
Last Modified: 10/01/09
Exhibit Categories

Curriculum resource: BU - 08346 "Newbie Know-How." Choose one of the following to exhibit at the fair:

  • Posters
  • Notebook report
  • (prepare proposal-like report covering the five W's and H. Who, What, Where, When, Why and How.) Please include screen shots in the report.

Requirements for your poster are:
1. Size: 22" x 28"
2. Mounted on stiff backing foamboard, pegboard, or very stiff cardboard
3. Your poster should be displayed horizontally and covered with plastic.

Note: If you choose to develop a computer program, a poster or notebook report depicting the program will be necessary for display at the fair.

Suggested Exhibit Topics

Your poster may cover one of the following areas (The exhibit topic each year must be different from previous years' exhibit.)

  • An educational exhibit you could use at school or for a demonstration that shows one part or several parts of computer equipment. Example: A poster showing the parts of a home computer system, or a poster illustrating the differences in the storage devices used in computers, or a poster showing how CD-ROM works. (Anything educational illustrating computer hardware would be acceptable. If you have questions call your 4-H leader or the Extension Office. )
  • A poster showing how computers are used to accomplish different tasks.
  • A poster showing how a career or occupation has been dramatically changed by computer technology.
  • A poster on any topic covered in the manual.
  • Any exhibit as described in the Level 1 manual.
    1. Cards for All Occasions
      Develop a series of 4 to 6 greeting cards for a variety of holidays or special occasions. Use clip art, scanned photos, or draw your own pictures. Can use software such as Word, Wordperfect, PrintShop or Publisher.
    2. Graphic Illustration
      Use a software program such as Paint, Paintbrush, Kid Pix Studio, or CorelDRAW, to make your own drawing and print it. Be creative.
    3. Computer Presentation
      Use a presentation software program such as PowerPoint, Kid Pix Studio, or HyperStudio to design a computer presentation on a topic you enjoy. You can present on your computer or print out overhead transparencies or display prints on a poster.
    4. Photograph Series
      Take a photograph and design a series of 4 to 6 special effects photos. You can use a morphing software such as MorphMan or Morph Filter software programs such as Adobe Gallery Effects, or
    5. Scrapbook or Poster
      Put together a scrapbook(notebook)or poster on a topic that you have investigated on the Web. The topic can be anything such as dinosaurs, space, favorite TV stars, music, science fiction characters, sports cars, fun vacation spots, etc. Print off the information you found on the Web and display it in a scrapbook (notebook) or on a poster.
    6. Storybook
      Write a story and illustrate it with pictures. Pictures can be original drawings, clip art or photos. Put them together in a storybook format.



 
Level:Level 2 (Suggested for 4-H members in grades 6 - 8 or those who feel they are capable of meeting the exhibit requirements of the project)
Last Modified: 10/22/09
Exhibit Categories

There are two curriculum options for Level 2:
1) BU - 08347 "Inside the Box" focuses on hardware and repair
2) BU - 08348 "Peer-to-Peer" focuses on networking, protocols and security.
You can choose either track for 1 year or three years depending on your interest.

Choose one of the following to exhibit at the fair:

  • Posters
  • Notebook report (prepare proposal-like report covering the five W's and H: Who, What, Where, When, Why and How). Please include screen shots in the report.

Requirements for your poster are
1. Size: 22" x 28"
2. Mounted on stiff backing foamboard, pegboard, or very stiff cardboard
3. Your poster should be displayed horizontally and covered with plastic.

Note: If you choose to develop a computer program, a poster or notebook report depicting the program will be necessary for display at the fair.

Suggested Exhibit Topics

Areas of emphasis that may be the focus of your exhibit include:

Note: The exhibit topic each year must be different from previous years' exhibit.

  1. Operating System Exhibit (DOS, Windows, OS2, Mac OS, etc.)
    • Create an educational poster or action demonstration that illustrates what DOS, Windows, OS/2, or Mac OS is and some of its major functionsor contrast or compare operating systems.
  2. Word Processing Exhibit
    • Design an educational poster or action demonstration that illustrates the advantages of word processing.
  3. Database Or Network Exhibit
    • Create a database on any database software and illustrate the different ways to manipulate data using the software.
    • Establish a network and diagram the components and flow
  4. Spreadsheet Exhibit
    • Make a simple spreadsheet that uses at least 100 cells. Show how you created it and how you plan to use it. Be sure to mention which software program you used and also submit a removable storage unit (i.e., disk, CD-ROM) containing the template you created.
  5. Educational Exhibit
    • Design an educational exhibit that illustrates at least three educational computer software programs for children or adults (choose one or the other). Show how these programs benefit the user.
    • Illustrate decisions flowchart on whether to repair or replace a system or establish a network security.
    • Prepare a poster that illustrates the importance of computers in the classroom and how school has changed because of computer use.
  6. Computer Games Exhibit
    • Prepare a poster that illustrates how computer games can be beneficial to people.
    • Design an educational exhibit that illustrates how computer games are made, what the market is for them, and how big a business the computer game industry is.
  7. WWW Homepage
    • Create a homepage that includes at least three HTM files with appropriate navigational links. The homepage should include both text and graphics.
  8. An exhibit that you created that fulfills one of these options.
    • T-Shirt
      Use a design software program such as Print Shop Deluxe or Publisher to create a T-shirt design using a combination of graphics and text. Use clip art, scanned photos, or draw your own pictures. Print your design on a T-shirt or on a piece of paper.
    • Animated Presentation
      Use a presentation software program such as PowerPoint, Kid Pix Studio, or HyperStudio, design an animated computer presentation on a topic you enjoy. You can animate text and other objects.
    • Magazine
      Use a word processing or desktop publishing software (Microsoft Works, Word, PageMaker, Publish It, Print Shop Deluxe, Claris Works) to create a magazine. The magazine should be at least eight pages and use a combination of graphics and text.
    • Photograph Series
      Use an imaging program like Adobe Photoshop, Jasc's Paint Shop Pro or Adobe Gallery Effects to create a series of special effects photos. The series of photos should use at least three of the following effects: textures, changing brightness and contrast,filters,magic wand techniques, composite images, cropping, or resizing,



 
Level:Level 3 (Suggested for 4-H members in grades 9 - 12 or those who feel they are capable of meeting the exhibit requirements of the project)
Last Modified: 10/22/09
Exhibit Categories

Curriculum resource: BU-08349 "Teens Teaching Tech"

Choose one of the following to exhibit at the fair

  • Posters
  • Notebook report (prepare proposal-like report covering the five W's and H: Who, What, Where, When, Why and How.) Please include screen shots in the report.

Requirements for your poster are
1. Size: 22" x 28"
2. Mounted on stiff backing foamboard, pegboard, or very stiff cardboard
3. Your poster should be displayed horizontally and covered with plastic.

Note: If you choose to develop a computer program, a poster or notebook report depicting the program will be necessary for display at the fair.

Suggested Exhibit Topics
  1. Desktop Publishing Exhibit
    Using desktop publishing software, prepare an educational poster illustrating what desktop publishing is and how it is used. Also submit a written report detailing the information presented with the poster. The report should also include details of a visit with someone who uses desktop publishing professionally. The completed exhibit should use both graphics and typewritten words to illustrate what desktop publishing is and how it is used.
  2. Advanced Spreadsheet Use
    Design a spreadsheet template to solve a problem that could help you or someone you know. The template should be created by you, and should use at least 500 cells and at least one macro. Exhibit the completed template on a removable storage unit (i.e., disk, CD-ROM) and include a typewritten user's guide that explains what the template does, a listing of all cells, and step-by-step instructions on how to use the template.
  3. Integrated Software Package
    Use integrated software (minimum of two software applications; i.e., create a document using a word processor to type the document and import a spreadsheet graph into the word processing document). Exhibit the completed document on a removable storage unit (i.e., disk, CD-ROM) and include a written report detailing the information presented with the display.
  4. Multimedia Software Package
    Use a multimedia software package to produce a computer program that incorporates the features of multimedia. Along with the computer program, prepare an educational display or written report explaining how you developed the program.
  5. WWW Homepage
    Develop a WWW homepage that incorporate some advanced programming skills such as, but not limited to FLASH, Java or JavaScript.
  6. An exhibit that you created that fulfills one of these options.
    a. Multimedia Computer Presentation
    Use a presentation software program such as Microsoft's Power Point, Appleworks, Hyperstudio, Kid Pix Studio, The Multimedia Workshop, QuickTime VR Authoring Studio, Lotus Freelance Graphics, Macromedia Director Shockwave Studio, Flash and Fireworks, Asymetric Tool Book, or Final Cut Pro) to design an animated computer presentation on a topic you enjoy. It should contain a minimum of 10 screens and include some graphics, sound and either a video clip or animation.
    b. Web Site for an Organization
    Use a web editor such as Sunburst's Web Workshop, Claris Home Page, Adobe Page Mill, Hot Dog, BB Edit, Microsoft's FrontPage Express , Netscape Composer or using HTML to design a Web site for an organization. It can be your 4-H club, an athletic team, school club, dance group, etc. The site should include a minimum of five different screens and some hyperlinks
    c. Magazine
    Use a word processing or desktop publishing software such as Microsoft Works, Word, PageMaker, Publish It, Print Shop Deluxe, Claris Works to create a magazine. The magazine should be at least 12 pages and use a combination of graphics and text. Print in color.
    d. Animated Program
    Use an animation program such as Macromedia Director Shockwave Studio, Flash and Fireworks, Asymetric Tool Book, or Final Cut Pro to create an animation program that can be used in a presentation.
    e.GIS Map
    Use a geographic information system (GIS) program like Arcview or Esc to make a map of your community. You may use prepared data or make your own. Try to include all the important features that make your community unique.



Consumer Clothing

Educational materials are designed to teach clothing selection, wardrobe planning, care of clothing, and personal grooming. Included are activities to be completed at home and in stores.
Exhibit Introduction

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements

 
Level:Beginner
Last Modified: 06/20/05
Exhibit Requirements
  • Complete one activity from each group in the manual. Write your results or answers in a notebook. Label each activity. This will help you talk to the judge easily.
  • Help purchase an item of clothing that you'll wear with other clothes in your wardrobe. Examples might be slacks, blouse, jeans, shirt, sweater, or sweatshirt. Choose an accessory to go with your purchase. You might buy shoes, sweatband, belt, jewelry, or socks.
  • Model your purchases. Tell the judge about them, what you learned, and about the activities you completed. Take your manual and notebook with you because they will help you talk with the judge.



 
Level:Intermediate
Last Modified: 06/20/05
Exhibit Requirements
  • Complete one activity from each group in the manual. Write your results or answers in a notebook. Label each activity. This will help you talk to the judge easily.
  • Purchase and accessorize a casual or school outfit. You may purchase accessories or select from items you already own.
  • Model your outfit. Tell the judge about your purchases, what you learned, and about the activities you completed. Take your manual and notebook with you because they will help you talk with the judge.



 
Level:Advanced
Last Modified: 06/20/05
Exhibit Requirements
  • Complete one activity from each group in the manual. Write your results or answers in a notebook. Label each activity. This will help you talk to the judge easily.
  • Choose an outfit and accessorize it. You may purchase or select from items you already own.
  • Model your outfit before a group. Tell them about your activities in this year's project and how you plan to use this year's purchases in your future wardrobe. Take your manual and notebook with you because they will help you talk with the judge.



Electric

The 4-H electricity/electronics program provides youth with educational information about electricity and how it can be used to benefit the human race. The electricity/electronics program develops project skills (i.e., safe practices, proper use of fuses and circuit breakers, proper lighting techniques, proper wiring techniques) and life skills (i.e., decision-making, using science and technology, developing communication skills). These fun-filled, hands-on learning experiences are provided under the direction of caring adults.
Exhibit Introduction

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements

 
Level:Division I
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Make a circuit board.
  2. Conduct a Hazard Hunt.
  3. Complete your record.
Exhibit

*Exhibit at your local or county fair a circuit board (using kit provided, label parallel or series circuit). "What I Have Done and Learned" is required for county only.




 
Level:Division II
Last Modified: 10/06/05
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Make a magnetic powered flashlight or exhibit a poster (22" x 28") on a topic described in the manual.
  2. Complete your record.
Exhibit

*Exhibit at your local or county fair either: magnetic powered flashlight or a poster (22" x 28") as outlined in the project manual or project CD.




 
Level:Division III
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Project Completion Recommendations

1. Make one of the following:

  1. Build an extension cord using all new parts
  2. Build an incandescent trouble light using all new parts
  3. Build a fluorescent trouble light using all new parts
  4. Repair an extension cord or trouble light by replacing the cord, plug, connector body or socket handle with a new part(s).
  5. Create a poster about
    • wire size
    • wire type
    • current carrying capacity
    • the parts of an extension cord or trouble light
    • an important safety-related topic
    • any topic covered in the Division III manual

      All poster exhibits are to be displayed horizontally, sized 22"x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other) and covered in clear plastic or transparent material. Place standard identification label with your name, grade and county in the lower right-hand corner of the poster.

2. Complete your record.
Note: For parameters on any of the above project options, see the Division III electric manual

Exhibit

*Exhibit at your local or county fair either: Extension cord; a trouble light or a poster as outlined in the project manual.




 
Level:Division IV
Last Modified: 09/01/06
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Complete the activities presented in the manual.
  2. Make or remake a lamp, or make a poster or display board on any topic covered in the manual
  3. Complete your record
Exhibit

*Exhibit one of the following at your local county fair.

  • Made or remade lamp
  • Display board on any topic covered in manual
  • Poster on any topic covered in this manual

All poster exhibits are to be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mount on a firm backing (foam-core board or other) and covered in clear plastic or transparent material. Place standard identification label with your name, grade and county in the lower right-hand corner of the poster.




 
Level:Division V
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Project Completion Recommendations

Upon completion of Wiring Around Your Home you will exhibit one of the following at your local or county fair:

Display board, poster, equipment wiring board, or written report in one of the following areas:

  • electrical work that you did around your home or other location and how you accomplished it (preferably with models, pictures or a small part of your total installation). Be sure to include a wiring diagram of your project with your exhibit.
  • analyze the current wiring situation in your home or out buildings and develop a new system that you feel would be better. Be sure to show diagrams of the old and new systems. Also, explain why the new proposed system is better.
  • any topic covered in this manual.

Note: Poster and display boards should be 22" tall by 28" wide. Equipment wiring boards differ from display boards in that they show hands-on wiring techniques (i.e., complete wiring of a light controlled by a three-way switch system). Equipment wiring boards should be no larger than 3' by 3'. The boards should be designed so that they can be displayed horizontally.

Exhibit



 
Level:Advanced Division
Last Modified: 06/21/05
Project Completion Recommendations

Select one of the following areas for study:

Heating and cooling
Lighting
Electronics
Power
Consumer Buying
Better methods--electrically
Careers

Exhibit

*Exhibit at the local or county fair: One article made, a written report, a chart, a diagram or photographs that tell the story, as listed in project manual.

One article or unit of electronic equipment.




Entomology

There are more kinds of insects in the world than all other organisms combined. They live on the earth's surface, in the soil, and in water. Insects live in deserts, rain forests, hot springs, snow fields, and dark caves. This project will help you study insect and their relationship with people. You can also learn how to collect, preserve, and identify insects.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the entomology project this year. State Fair Exhibits -- each county may send one Insect Collection and one Poster for each level (grades 3-5, grades 6-8, and grades 9 and up) for a maximum of 6 exhibits per county. Follow the "Notes" under each section (Insect Collection and Poster).

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements

Important Notes:

  • Title:
    Collection - Insect Collection, Grade X (where X = your grade in school)
    Poster - Choose one of the topics listed below, appropriate for your grade in school, and use that topic for your exhibit title.
  • Orders:
    Use the orders listed in the reference material (above), which are found on page 57 in ID-401

    • Display:
      Collect, mount (pins or vials), and identify insects personally collected in the U.S. only.

      Display your best specimens in an 18 x 24 inch box(es), orientated horizontally. When multiple boxes are used: list the box order (i.e. "box 1 of 3 boxes") and include your name in each box.

      ID 401 A-F cards Cards A-F (for grades 3-8) and 401-I cards (for grades 9 - 12) are to be placed inside the display box in an attractive manner. ID 401-I cards, (for grades 9-12), should be placed in the lower right hand corner of box #1.

  • Identification:
    Collection display boxes are expected to contain the specified number of insects, families, and orders specified (see chart below).

    All insects must be in the adult stage and be properly mounted on insect pins or be contained in vials as directed.

    Pin Labels: Each pin or vial must contain two labels:
    1) Top label is to include collection date, location, and collector name.
    2) Bottom label is to include common name and other optional identification data

    Box Labels: Box labels (computer generated or neatly printed) are used for orders and families as required (see chart below) and are to be placed flat against the bottom of the box. Insects must be properly grouped directly under the correct order and family box label. For example, all insects belonging to a particular order must be placed under that order label. Orders to be used are listed in the reference book ID- 401. If family level identification is required, the insects should be further grouped together under that family label.
  • Educational Box:
    One additional box (educational), based on the specific theme (see chart below), is required for grades 9-12, in addition to the insect collection boxes. This box can be created in any manner chosen (without the mounting, pinning or identifying restrictions specified above).
Level:Insect Collection Option: Grades 3-12
Last Modified: 10/01/12
Exhibit
Grade
Display

Max. #
Collection Boxes

3
10 insects, identified and pinned on cards (ID 401A)
1
4
20 insects, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name and identify five (5) to order. Include card ID 401B.
1
5
30 insects, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name and identify 15 to order. Include ID 401C.
1
6
40 insects, exhibit a minimum of 6 orders, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name and order. Include ID 401D.
2
7
50 insects, exhibit a minimum of 8 orders, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name and order. Identify ten (10) to family. Include card ID 401E.
2
8
60 insects, exhibit a minimum of 10 orders, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name and order. Identify 30 to family. Include card ID 401F.
2
9
70 insects, exhibit a minimum of 12 orders, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name, order, and family. One educational box, theme: insect behavior. Include card ID 401I.(1-3 collection boxes plus 1 educational box*). Place ID 401I in first collection box only.
Card ID 401I download
3
10
80 insects, exhibit a minimum of 14 orders, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name, order, and family. One educational box, theme: insect pest management. Include card ID 401I. (1-3 collection boxes plus 1 educational box*). Place ID 401I in first collection box only.
Card ID 401I download
3
11
90 insects, exhibit a minimum of 16 orders, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name, order, and family. One educational box, theme: insects in the environment. Include card ID 401I. ((1-3 collection boxes plus 1 educational box*). Place ID 401I in first collection box only.
Card ID 401I download
3
12
100 insects, exhibit a minimum of 18 orders, mounted (pins or vials). Identify all insects by common name, order, and family. One educational box, theme: benefits of insects. Include card ID 401I. (1-3 collection boxes plus 1 educational box*). Place ID 401I in first collection box only.
Card ID 401I download
3

*Educational box – The educational box (grades 9 - 12) is in addition to the insect display box(es). This box should be created in such a way as to teach something about the assigned theme to the general public.

Max. # Collection boxes *



Poster Option:
Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the entomology project this year. Posters are to be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other), and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Choose one of the topics listed below, appropriate for your grade in school, and use that topic for your exhibit title, so the judges know which activity you completed. You can also use a creative sub-title if you wish
.

Level:Poster Entomology 1: Grades 3-5 BU-8440
Last Modified: 10/01/12
Exhibit
Display a poster based on the following activities:

  • Big Mouth Bugs -- Show the four (4) different mouth types that you studied. Create a chart listing the four mouth types, an insect with this mouth type, food they eat, and where these insects might be found.
  • FACETnating! -- Show how insects see (compound eyes) and explain how they see colors.
  • Pit Stop -- Make two pit traps and use them to collect insects. Exhibit your completed record sheet. You can use the format given for your data collection, or make your own. Include some of the insects, or pictures of your trap and insects collected.
  • Buz-z-zing Around -- Present three to five ways that insects communicate. Include an insect, or picture of each insect that communicates in each of the ways you are describing.
  • Ants and Uncles -- Compare insects with their non-insect relatives by completing the chart in your book (copy or make your own). Include some of the insects and their non-insect relatives, or pictures of them, on your poster.
  • Chirp, Chirp -- Watch and listen to the crickets for five minutes, three times a day, for three days. Include day and night observations. Record what you see and hear.
Max. # Collection boxes *
NA



 
Level:Poster Entomology 2: Grades 6-8 BU-8441
Last Modified: 10/01/12
Exhibit

Display a poster based on the following activities:

  • Collecting Insects -- Use two of the insect collecting traps described in Activity 2 (Berlese Funnel, Indoor Insect Trap), Activity 3 (Modified Wilkinson Trap), Activity 4 (Fruit Bait), or Activity 5 (Light Attractor) to collect insects. Exhibit a picture of your traps and an Insect Collection Data Chart that gives the trap location (for example, in the basement or in the back yard), date collected, and insects collected.
  • Spread Your Wings and Fly -- Make and use a spreading board. Exhibit two pictures of your spreading board and three butterflies or moths that you prepared using your board.
  • Insect Experiments -- Complete one of the following activities: Activity 8 (Color My World), Activity 9 (Sowbug Investigations), or Activity 10 (Life's Stages). Exhibit your data sheet and answers to the "Talk It Over" questions. For activities 8 and 9 include your hypothesis and a conclusive statement about your hypothesis (indicate if it was proved or disproved).
  • Invasive Species Investigations -- Create an informational exhibit about one (Indiana) invasive insect. Include the information requested in the activity for this insect (first eight (8) questions on page 29).
  • A Sticky Situation --Make and use sticky traps for four weeks as described in Activity 13. Exhibit your data sheet and the answers to "Talk It Over" questions.
  • Footprint Clues -- Study the tracks of 3 different species of insect and one arthropod as described in Activity 14. Exhibit your data sheet and the answers to "Talk It Over" questions.
Max. # Collection boxes *
NA



 
Level:Poster Entomology 3: Grades 9-12 BU-8442
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Exhibit

Display a poster based on the following activities:

  • The Scientific Method - Use the scientific method to complete one of the problems listed in Activity 3. Describe what you did to complete the five scientific method steps and include your data and drawings or pictures of your experiment.
  • Transecting for Insects - Compare three habitats using the scientific method to determine which one has the most terrestrial insect activity. Display your transect data sheet for each habitat and answer the "Talk It Over" questions.
  • Please Drop In -- Create your own hypothesis and collect insects in five pitfall traps to prove or disprove your hypothesis, as described in Activity 7. Display how you completed your experiment (including each step in the scientific method) and your data for each habitat.
  • Aliens Among Us -- Complete the "Natives vs Non-natives Survey Data Sheet" by checking two boxes (Native or non-native and damage or no damage) for five native and five non-native insects as shown in Activity 9. Answer the "Talk It Over" questions.
  • IPM -- Learning and Teaching - Make an informational flier and use it to teach younger 4-H members about five insect pests that might be found in a home or school in your county. Exhibit your flier, lesson plan, and photograph of you teaching. Answer the "Talk It Over" questions.
  • Meal from a Worm -- Use the scientific method to study how mealworm larvae grow. Include your hypothesis, data charts, and conclusions. Answer the "Talk It Over" questions.
Max. # Collection boxes *
NA



 
Level:Independent Study: Grades 9-12 (One State Fair Entry)
Last Modified: 09/21/07
Exhibit
  • Advanced Topic - • Advanced topic - Learn all you can about a topic of your choice and present it on a poster or in an Entomology box. Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the works cited to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster, "Advanced Entomology - Independent Study"
  • Mentoring - Exhibit a poster that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Advanced Entomology - Mentor".
Max. # Collection boxes *
NA



Floriculture

Youth will learn basic information and skills needed to grow healthy plants and flowers. The project is divided in four different levels.
Exhibit Introduction

Entries per exhibitor:
Counties may choose to allow one (1) arrangement type or one (1) poster/notebook type exhibit per exhibitor (exhibitors are not required to do both). Each exhibitor may also choose to do a demonstration in addition to an arrangement and/or notebook/poster.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.

State Fair:
Each county will be allowed to send one (1) flower and plant exhibit per category per level and one (1) poster or notebook exhibit per level, and one (1) demonstration per exhibitor. Total entries allowed per county: Level A, four (4) flower and plant exhibits and one (1) poster/notebook; Level B, three (3) flower and plant exhibits and one (1) poster/notebook; Level C, six (6) flower and plant exhibits and one (1) poster/notebook; and Level D, six (6) flower and plant exhibits and one (1) poster/notebook.

Note to youth exhibitors:
Each Level (A, B, C, D) of the Floriculture project serves more than one grade. You should do a DIFFERENT activity and exhibit each year that you are in the project. For example, if in 3rd grade you display a simple bud vase (category 1), in 4th grade you should choose a poster/notebook option or flower/plant exhibit from categories 2,3 or 4. You should pay special attention to size guidelines for Flower and Plant Exhibits. Instructions for exhibits and related activities can be found in the 4-H Floriculture student manuals:
4-H 966 Floriculture: Level A
4-H 967 Floriculture: Level B
4-H 968 Floriculture: Level C
4-H 969 Floriculture: Level D
CD-4-H 989 Floriculture: Supplement CD

Notebook and Poster Guidelines:

Notebook Guidelines

Poster Guidelines



Requirements

 
Level:Level A, Grades 3 and 4
Last Modified: 10/01/11
Exhibit
Flower and Exhibit Categories
  1. Create flower arrangement in a simple bud vase, provide your own vase, from cut flowers you grew in your garden.
    • Vase must be no more than 9 inches tall by 3 inches wide, neck opening of vase not to exceed 1.5 inches and be clear or white only. Include 1-3 stemsof a main flower, along with appropriate amount of filler flower and greenery.
  2. Create flower arrangement in a simple bud vase, provide your own vase, from fresh flowers you purchased.
    • Vase must be no more than 9 inches tall by 3 inches wide, neck opening of vase not to exceed 1.5 inches and be clear or white only. Include 1-3 stems of a main flower, along with appropriate amount of filler flower and greenery. Flowers should be in their natural state, and not wired for display.
  3. Create a simple round arrangement (small, compact round cluster of flowers) with fresh flowers you purchased. Including the vase or container, it must be no larger than 12"x 12".
  4. Create a simple round arrangement (small, compact round cluster of flowers) with fresh flowers you grew. Including the vase or container, it must be no larger than 12"x 12".
Poster or Notebook Exhibits - choose any one (1) of the following topics:
  1. Chronicle your work in your flower garden (planning, planting, care, harvest, arrangement made with your flowers)
  2. Describe how you planned or designed your garden, including how you chose the kinds of flowers.
  3. Explain how you harvested your flowers, cared for them, and used them in an arrangement.
  4. Explore and explain: pollination - what it is, why important, different ways it occurs or transplanting - what, how, things to watch out for; or role of insects with flowers (good, bad or both).
  5. Explore and explain seed germination or how to care for a 'sick' plant
  6. Report on interview with a professional (what do they do, types of jobs, type of training, hours worked, etc.)
  7. Describe an experiment you did and the results
  8. Describe a community service project you did related to your flowers project
Demonstration

Participate in an action demo at state fair or demonstration contest related to topics for this grade level, or any of those listed above.




 
Level:Level B, Grades 5 and 6
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Exhibit
Flower and Plant Exhibit Categories
  1. Display a mixed planter that may include herbs with foliage plants and/or flowering plants. The planter should include 3 or more kinds of plants and have been planted at least two months before the fair.The container exhibit space must not exceed 18"x 18" (height will be variable). Must include 4-H 967c "Level B Plant Record" chronicling the care of your plant.
  2. Make an item with dried herbs or dried flowers that you grew yourself. Examples of items to exhibit are, but not limited to, a dried flower product, or a simple dried arrangement in a container. (Exhibit not to exceed 18" X 18").
  3. Display one house plant (foliage and/or flowering) in a container not to exceed 10 inches in diameter. There must be only one specimen plant per pot. A flowering plant may be of any color with single or double flowers. Must include 4-H 967c "Level B Plant Record" chronicling the care of your plant.
Poster or Notebook Exhibits - choose any one (1) of the following topics:
  1. Report how you harvested your flowers and/or herbs, cared for them, dried them, and used them.
  2. Explore and explain: insects and your flowers and/or herbs
  3. Explore and explain: starting seeds indoors -- the process and pros and cons
  4. Explore and explain: perennials -- what are they, how are they used, benefits or drawbacks
  5. Investigate and describe: a butterfly garden -- what types of plants, benefits to insects and butterflies, etc.
  6. Describe how you planned or designed your garden, including how you chose the kinds of plants, any problems, successes
  7. Describe your houseplant - how you cared for, transplanted to larger pot, any problems, or successes
  8. Explore and explain: plant biology -- form and function, growth, photosynthesis, etc.
  9. Explore and explain: how to grow plants indoors -- things to consider, common problems and solutions
  10. Explore and explain: environmental effects related to plants (such as light, water, soil, or temperature)
  11. Describe an experiment you did and the results
  12. Explore and explain topics from "Imagine That" -- plants around the world, information about different cultural uses of plants, different ways you used your plants/herbs/flowers.
Demonstration:

Participate in an action demo at state fair or demonstration contest related to topics for this grade level, or any of those listed above




 
Level:Level C, 7, 8 and 9
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit
Flower and Plant Exhibit Categories
  1. Display a terrarium
    • Size of the terrarium should be appropriate for use on a table at home, and no larger than 12" deep, 18" long and 16" high. Must have a cover while on exhibit. See activity information for design.
  2. Combination or European planter
    • Exhibit a container of plants (3 or more kinds of plants) that you have planted and cared for a minimum of 2 months. See activity for information on plants and design. The container should not exceed exhibit space of 18" x 18" (height will be variable).
  3. Create one (1) corsage or two (2) boutonnieres made from only fresh flowers. Corsages should contain 3 or more blooms. NO artificial flowers or greenery should be used in this category. Bows and decorative items are okay.
  4. Create one (1) corsage or two (2) boutonnieres made from silk or other artificial flowers and greenery. Can be created with mixed fresh and artificial materials, or all artificial. Bows and decorative items are okay
  5. A dried arrangement in a container or a specialty item (such as, but not limited to, a wreath or swag) made with dried flowers and dried plant materials. NO artificial flowers/plant material should be included. Bows and decorative items are okay. Maximum size 24" x 24", height will be variable.
  6. Create a flower arrangement using either roses or lilies as the primary component of the arrangement. Arrangement should be made with all fresh materials (NO artificial, flowers/plant material). Bows and decorative items are okay. The exhibit must not exceed 18" x 18" (height will be variable).
Poster or Notebook Exhibits - choose any one (1) of the following topics:
  1. Explore and explain: vegetative propagation -- how to, different types, problems and solutions, different uses of
  2. Explore and explain: plant nutrients -- what are they, why does the plant need them, what happens if the plant has too much or too little, planters or containers vs. garden.
  3. Investigate the design of multiple plant containers -- how to, things to considers, selecting lant materials, uses of
  4. Describe how you created your corsage or boutonnieres; or dried arrangement. Be sure to include appropriate information on design principles and how they are used to create your arrangement.
  5. Explore and explain: floral tools and materialS (how to use, what they are, care of tools, different uses of a tool or material)
  6. Explore and explain: preserving cut flowers -- how, problems, uses of and/or diseases related to cut flowers
  7. Illustrate, explore and explain how you dry flowers or other plant materials and/or describe different methods and/or how, why use them.
  8. Explore and explain: medicinal uses and toxicity of fresh and dried flowers and plants.
  9. Describe an experiment you did and the results.
  10. Describe a career exploration activity you did, such as job shadow, interview with a professional.
  11. Describe a community service activity you did related to your flowers project -- what you did, why, results, etc.
Demonstration

Participate in an action demo at state fair or demonstration contest related to topics for this grade level, or any of those listed above




 
Level:Level D, Grades 10, 11 and 12
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit
Flower and Plant Exhibit Categories
  1. Create a seasonal arrangement from only fresh flower and/or plant materials. Flowers and plant materials specific to a season or holiday should be used. For example, fall mums or spring tulips. Maximum size 24"x24"x36". This category could include a traditional floral arrangement, but also items such as wreaths. Bows and decorative accessories are okay.
  2. Create a seasonal arrangement that can include fresh and/or artificial flower/plant material. Flowers and plant materials specific to a season or holiday should be used. Maximum size 24"x24"x36". This category could include a traditional floral arrangement, but also items such as wreaths. Bows and decorative accessories are okay.
  3. Create a modern or contemporary style arrangement using fresh flower and plant materials. See manual for suggestions. Maximum size 24"x24"x36". Include a label that states what type of design you have created (botanical, pavè, parallel, free-form, abstract, etc.)
  4. Create a bridal bouquet. Proper display of the bouquet should be considered, but only the bouquet will be judged. Bouquet should include only fresh plant materials. Bows and decorative accessories are okay.
  5. Create a centerpiece for an event, such as a banquet, party, wedding, funeral, or church. Arrangement should be no larger than 24"x 24" x 36" and be made from EITHER fresh flower and/or plant materials or artificial or silk flower and/or plant materials. Bows and decorative accessories are okay.
  6. Display a plant that you propagated (and grew and cared for) by tissue culture or other vegetative propagation methods, or flowering bulbs that you forced. Maximum pot size should not exceed 10" diameter. Must include 4-H 969c Level D Plant Record chronicling the care of your plant.
Poster or Notebook Exhibits - choose any on one (1) of the following topics:
  1. Describe how you created your arrangement, include information on the design principles utilized.
  2. Explore and explain how you utilize different flowers to make a similar style arrangement for different seasons (tulips in spring, mums in fall, etc.) or how to utilize similar flowers to make different styles of arrangements.
  3. Explore and explain: the cost of arrangement and/or a cost comparison with flowers (different types flowers, different time year, etc.).
  4. Explore and explain: forcing flowers (bulbs, branches, etc.).
  5. Explore and explain: marketing in the floral industry (large or small business) and/ or a market survey and results, and how they can benefit the floral industry.
  6. Explore and explain: how to start a business related to the floral industry and may include a business plan.
  7. Explore and explain the origins of flowers and/or the floriculture industry around the world.
  8. Explore and explain: tissue culture, biotechnology, or traditional breeding of new flower types -- what are they, how are they used, pros and cons.
  9. Explore and explain: be a plant detective -- what kinds of problems might you have in growing and caring for flowers, and how to solve.
  10. Describe an experiment you did and the results.
  11. Describe a community service activity you did related to your flowers project: how, why, results.
Demonstration

Participate in an action demo at state fair or demonstration contest related to topics for this grade level, or any of those listed above.




Foods

The "Fantastic Foods" curriculum series is designed to help youth have fun in the kitchen as they prepare different foods, do fun experiments, and go on fact-finding missions. The curriculum is designed around six major categories: healthy food selection, smart food purchasing, food safety and science, food preparation, food preservation, careers, and food around the world.

A total of five pieces are available in the series. The four youth activity guides: Six Easy Bites (grades 3-4), Tasty Tidbits (grades 5-6), You're the Chef (grades 7-9), and Foodworks (grades 10-12) have been designed to be developmentally appropriate for the grades listed; but may be used by youth in any grade based on their project skills and expertise. The fifth piece, the Project Helper Guide, has been designed to provide an adult, the guiding helper, with some additional background and some tips on helping youth through the activities in their guide.
Are you ready to do fun experiments, prepare flavor-filled recipes, and go on fact-finding missions? That is what "Fantastic Foods" series is all about. You will have fun learning about different food ingredients, food characteristics, and food safety issues.

Your project manual is divided into six "bites": Once You Swallow, Money Talks, Play It Safe, Kitchen Magic, Eat It Later, and Imagine That.

Exhibit Introduction

Extension Educators are to delete current foods exhibit requirements from their county handbook and fully replace with these requirements that will be used in 2015.

Exhibit Introduction
Purdue Extension Food Safety Policy (effective 11/2013):
For food competitions - Filling, frosting, glazing, pie filling, and meringue, (whether uncooked or cooked) are not permitted to contain cream cheese, sour cream, heavy cream, or whipped cream as the nature of these products increases the moisture content and water activity of the food. Foods with a higher moisture content and water activity can be ideal growing conditions for food borne pathogens, even if the ingredient is part of a batter and baked. Additionally, raw milk, raw milk products or uncooked eggs/egg whites are not permitted. Eggs/egg whites that have been cooked to 160°F (i.e. pasteurized or included as part of a batter and baked) are acceptable. No home-canned fruits, vegetables, or meats are permitted in products. Recipes must be provided that show which ingredients were used in each part of the product. Contestants should carefully wash their hands and make sure that their hands do not have any open cuts before preparing foods. Contestants should not be preparing food exhibits for competition within 48 hours of recovering from any illness. Whenever possible, baked products should be transported and stored in chilled coolers (41°F).

Judges and individuals who will consume products from county and state competitions should be informed that they are at risk for foodborne illness since the established policy cannot guarantee that an entry which may be a "potentially hazardous food" has been properly prepared or handled before, during or following the competition. Tasting of a food product is solely at the discretion of the judge. Judges are NOT to taste any low-acid or acidified preserved food, like green beans or tomato products, and are discouraged from tasting any other home preserved food.

Consumers of competitive food exhibits being sold at auction or used for hospitality purposes should be notified they could be at risk for foodborne illness since the established policy cannot guarantee that an entry which may be a “potentially hazardous food” has been properly prepared or handled before, during, or following the competition.

Instructions for preparing food exhibits for display at State Fair (these instructions may be adapted for use in your county):

Labeling:

  1. Cover label with clear plastic wrap so that it will not become grease stained.
  2. Tape label to the paper plate or container before the product is wrapped.

Recipe or index cards:

  1. A recipe card or index card (no larger than 5 1/2" x 8 1/2") is required for all food exhibits.
    Be sure to include all the information requested in the exhibit description, as well as your name, county, and the dept.-section-class numbers. It is recommended that you wrap the card in plastic wrap or in a plastic bag. Recipe cards will not be returned.
  2. Since it is illegal in the State of Indiana for youth under the age of 21 to purchase or consume alcoholic beverages, 4-H members are to use recipes that do not include an alcoholic beverage as an ingredient. A suitable non-alcoholic or imitation product may be substituted.

Food preservation jars/containers:

  1. All canned products must have the ring on the jar top to protect the seal.
  2. Containers will NOT be returned from the Indiana State Fair.

How to prepare products for display.

  1. Most food products should be displayed on a paper or foam plate.
  2. For cakes - cut a piece of cardboard about 1/2 inch larger than the bottom of the cake. Cover this cardboard with wax paper, plastic wrap, or foil before putting the cake on it.
  3. Any product that may be sticky on the bottom, such as some fancy breads, should be put on round, square, or rectangle cardboard. Cover this cardboard with wax paper, plastic wrap, or foil before putting the food product on it.
  4. Frozen food exhibits (containers and food) will not be returned to the exhibitor. Please display in freezer bags or disposable freezer containers.
  5. Pies should be exhibited in disposable pie tin. Reusable containers or pans will NOT be returned from the Indiana State Fair.


Requirements

 
Level:Level A Grade 3
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit

(Participants may exhibit one baked and/or one preserved item per grade)

  • Three snack-sized drop, molded or bar baked cookies. No glaze or frosting. Include recipe card and display on a dessert size paper or foam plate.
  • A package of 3 baked, snack-sized frozen cookies. Display in freezer bag or freezer container. (NOTE: Freezer containers will not be returned.) Include index card with recipe and instructions for defrosting. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.



 
Level:Level A Grade 4
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit

(Participants may exhibit one baked and/or one preserved item per grade)

  • Three muffins that contain an ingredient that is a source of Vitamin A or Vitamin C (no muffin liners). Include recipe card.
  • One package of frozen berries. Display in freezer bag or freezer container. (NOTE: Freezer containers will not be returned.) Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking or defrosting. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.



 
Level:Level B Grade 5
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit

(Participants may exhibit one baked and/or one preserved item per grade)

  • A square, oblong or round layer reduced-fat cake without frosting. Reduce the amount of fat in the recipe by using a fruit puree or baby food fruit product that does not contain yogurt. Include recipe card.
  • One uncooked frozen mini-pizza using whole-grain pita bread, English muffin, bagel, or already prepared crust (no larger than 7" in diameter) with toppings of your choice. Include at least 4 MyPlate food groups on your pizza. Meat toppings such as hamburger, sausage, bacon, etc. must be cooked. Display on covered cardboard inside freezer bag. Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.



 
Level:Level B Grade 6
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit

(Participants may exhibit one baked and/or one preserved item per grade)

  • Three no-yeast, any shape pretzels with a whole grain flour (shaped, stick, or nugget) OR 3 no-yeast sweet or savory rolled biscuits with a whole grain flour (no drop biscuits.) Include recipe card.
  • One package of any frozen vegetable or combination vegetables. Display in freezer bag or freezer container. (NOTE: Freezer containers will not be returned.) Include index card with instructions for cooking. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.



 
Level:Level C Grade 7, 8, 9
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit

Exhibitors may choose one baked and/or one preserved product from the following list. It is suggested a participant choose a different option each year, but this is not a requirement.


BAKED PRODUCT OPTIONS:

  • Three (3) yeast bread sticks or yeast rolls (any shape, medium size - not a sweet roll), using a whole grain such as whole wheat, rye, oat bran, etc. Include recipe card. Participants are expected to learn how to knead bread dough by hand and allow it to rise appropriately. It is NOT acceptable to use a home bread maker.
  • A yeast bread (can be loaf, braid, but not rolls) using a whole grain such as whole wheat, rye, oat bran, etc. Include recipe card. Participants are expected to learn how to knead bread dough by hand and allow it to rise appropriately. It is NOT acceptable to use a home bread maker.
  • One package of a non-perishable, invented healthy snack (such as a granola bar, popcorn snack, trail mix, etc.). Your snack must include at least 2 food groups from MyPlate. Exhibit must include a separate folder containing a marketing plan with product name, recipe, how it will be packaged, a package design, where it will be sold and suggested selling price. Style your snack for a photo shoot and include the picture in your marketing plan. Label should include product name, date, quantity, and serving size.


PRESERVED PRODUCT OPTIONS

  • One (1) container of freezer jam. Include index card with recipe and instructions for storing. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
  • One jar of a canned tomato product using the Hot Pack Method for a boiling water bath canner, such as tomato juice, catsup, barbecue sauce, or salsa. Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking or using the product. Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned. Note: Only food preservation products made using USDA approved or Ball Blue Book recipes are acceptable.
  • One jar of a canned pickled product or canned pickles. Include index card with recipe, processing, and storage instructions. (Products using a fancy pack are not accepted.) Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned. Note: Only food preservation products made using USDA approved or Ball Blue Book recipes are acceptable.



 
Level:Level D Grade 10, 11, 12
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit

Exhibitors may choose one baked and/or one preserved product from the following list. It is suggested a participant choose a different option each year, but this is not a requirement.

BAKED PRODUCT OPTIONS:

  • A single or double crust baked fruit pie (no graham cracker crust). Include recipe card. (Note: Custards, cream, cream cheese frosting and fillings, and raw egg white frosting are not acceptable in an exhibit because they are highly perishable when left at room temperatures.)
  • A non-perishable baked food product for a catered meal or special event in which organizers have requested low fat and/or reduced sugar items. With your food product, include a separate page outlining how this product is to be used at the event or a table display for the event. Make sure to note any ingredients that could cause an allergic reaction. The display should include a notebook outlining menu, supplies to buy, preparation schedule, equipment, table layout, etc. Display should be no larger than 16" deep x 22" wide x 28" high. Include index card with recipe.
  • Select a condition in which people have to specifically modify their eating habits (diabetes, heart disease, Celiac disease, food allergies, etc.) Prepare a non-perishable baked food product appropriate for someone with this condition. With your food product, include a notebook summarizing the condition or allergy, nutrition considerations involved with the condition, a description of your baked item, and an explanation of how it fits within the nutrition considerations. Make sure to note any ingredients that could cause an allergic reaction. Include index card with recipe.

PRESERVED PRODUCT OPTIONS:

  • One jar of pressure canned vegetables, meat or combination product, such as soup, stew, spaghetti sauce with meat, etc. Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking or using the product. (Products using a fancy pack are not accepted.) Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned. Note: Only food preservation products made using USDA approved or Ball Blue Book recipes are acceptable.
  • One package of a combination food frozen entree in freezer container. The combination food should contain 3 food groups from MyPlate. Exhibit should include an index card with recipe and instructions for reheating. Display in disposable containers. No containers will be returned. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
  • A jar of cooked jam or a reduced-sugar fruit spread. Include recipe card. Label with name of product, quantity, and date made.



Forestry

The forestry project will help you to learn how to identify trees, uses of trees, the benefits of trees, and the importance of our woodlands. A knowledge of trees and woodland management leads to a greater enjoyment of the outdoors. An understanding of tree characteristics will allow future landowners to choose the best varieties for urban or rural benefits that include cooling, wildlife habitat, and reducing erosion and other types of pollution.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the forestry project this year. Exhibits must be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other), and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Be sure to include a label with your name, grade, and county. Choose one of the topics listed below, appropriate for your grade in school, and use that topic for your exhibit title.

If you are exhibiting leaves, they should be free of any damage. If you choose to write scientific names, they must be in either italics or underscored. (Note: scientific names are required for herbariums.) The Genus (first name) must have the first letter capitalized. The species (second name) has no capitalization.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.

 



Requirements

 
Level:Forestry 1: Grades 3-5 (BU-8038, Follow the Path. One State Fair entry per county)
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit
Display a poster based on one of the following activities
  • Leafing Out- comparisons (pp 6 & 7). Collect, dry and mount 6 different species of leaves showing leaf differences: one leaf with opposite arrangement and one with an alternate arrangement, two leaves with different leaf margins, a compound leaf, and simple leaf. Use the 50 Trees of Indiana book (4-H 15-80 or CD-FNR-3) as a reference and identify the leaves and group them under the titles of "arrangement," "leaf margins," and "compound or simple." Draw (or copy the picture) and label the parts of a leaf using the diagram from the manual (Level 1). Title your poster, Leafing Out - Leaf Differences.
  • Leafing Out - collection (pp 6 & 7). Identify and exhibit leaves from 10 different trees that are listed in 50 Trees of Indiana book (4-H 15-80 or CD-FNR-3). List at least two unique characteristics of each tree. Title your poster, Leafing Out - Collection.
  • Hold on Tight (pp 10 & 11), Dig up a small plant root system and display along with a drawing of the root system with the anchor, lateral, and feeder roots identified and the "Parts of a Tree" diagram (4-H 641B).
  • Down in the Dirt(pp 20 & 21), collect roots from 3 different habitats: woods, near a creek, and in a pasture or prairie. (Note: do not use the habitats listed in your manual.) Display the roots along with the completed root test chart (copy or recreate) showing the color, size, and shape information. Include any unique features you noted.
  • My Couch is a Tree? (pp 30 & 31), Use pictures (draw, cut from magazines, print, or take photographs) to show 10 things in and around your home that are made from wood.
  • Fun in the Forest (pp 32 & 33), Visit a state park or forest, take your 50 Trees of Indiana book (4-H 15-80 or CD-FNR-3), diagram the trails you hiked, and list the types of trees you saw. Photographs of you hiking and some of the trees you saw will help tell your story.



 
Level:Forestry 2: Grades 6-8: Grades 6-8 (BU-8039, Reach for the Canopy. One State Fair entry per county.
Last Modified: 10/10/08
Exhibit

Display a poster based on one of the following activities:

  • The Leaf Machine (pp 8 & 9), copy, draw, or find a picture of a cross-section of a leaf. Label the 7 parts. Give the chemical reaction for photosynthesis, defining the chemicals: CO2, H2O, O2, and C6H12O6. Be sure to balance your equation! There should be the same number of Carbon, Oxygen, and Hydrogen molecules on each side of the equal sign. You may need to ask an older (high school) 4-H member or science teacher for help. Draw the tree canopy, trunk, and roots (or use the tree diagram, 4-H 641B) and identify the crown, trunk (with the parts; heartwood, sapwood, cambium, and bark listed on the right), feeder roots, and anchor roots.
  • My State's Forests (pp 14 & 15), use a map, draw, or find a picture of Indiana on the Internet (e.g., www.igic.org). Show where your home, your school, and your fairgrounds are located. Choose one of the following options to complete your poster.
    • Show where Indiana's state forests are located. List a few facts about each. Visit a state forest and have someone take your picture by the sign, if possible.
    • Show where some state parks and state forests are located (5-15). List some facts about each one. Visit a state park or forest and have someone take your picture by the sign, if possible.
  • Someone Call a (Tree) Doctor and Stop Bugging Me (pp 22-25), Collect 10 samples of tree leaves, twigs, stems, or roots damaged by insects or disease and the fruiting body or disease that caused the damage. List information about the insect or disease and the species of tree that was affected.
  • Fire in the Forest (pp 26 & 27), explain the Fire Triangle and describe what happened during and after a famous forest fire. Drawings or pictures will help tell the tale.
  • Growing Every Day (pp 30 & 31), Complete the table to calculate the volume of 5 large trees that you can find and measure in your county. Research to find out how to make and use a Tree Measuring Stick (FNR-4) and use that to calculate the volume of each tree. Explain why you think your results varied with the two methods of determining tree volume (the one in your 4-H manual or using a tree measuring stick).
  • Tree Planting Plant 1-3 shade trees. Include information about the tree (or trees) you planted, why you chose the species you did, what are the benefits of this tree, and how tall this tree (or trees) will be when mature. Explain why you chose the planning site that you did, where you found your planting information, what steps you followed, the hole size, care of your tree (watering and weed control), and any other information you can give. Include a picture of your tree (photo or a drawing). Reference: FNR-FAQ-18-W



 
Level:Forestry 3: Grades 9-12 (BU-8040, Explore the Deep Woods. One State Fair entry per county
Last Modified: 09/21/07
Exhibit

Display a poster based on one of the following activities:

  • A World of Forests (pp 16 & 17), indicate the 3 major forest biomes on a copy, drawing, or picture of the world. Complete the table given in the activity.
  • City Trees (pp 20 & 21), complete the questions about Tree City (page 20). Show (draw or use pictures) some trees that are often used in city plantings and explain the benefits of these trees.
  • Trim the Trees (pp 26 & 27), explain the 5 different kinds of tree pruning for urban trees. List some do's and dont's of proper pruning.
  • My Boss is a Tree (pp 34 & 35), list 5 jobs that require a knowledge of trees and forestry. Explain the training and education that is needed and what types of things you might be doing if you had this job.
  • Tree Planting - Present a tree planting plan for at least 100 trees. Include the type of trees you planted, pictures, cost, method of planting, weeding, pruning your trees, and any additional information. Your exhibit must have a title, labels, backing, and plastic covering as required in the manual. Reference: FNR-FAQ-18-W
  • Herbarium Collection - Trees Collect 25 terminal twigs and at least two leaves, if space allows (only one compound leaf is required), from native forest trees. Mount the specimens on 11 ½" x 16 ½" paper. One leaf on the twig must be mounted to show the back side of the leaf. Label each sheet with the following: common name, scientific name, where collected, county where collected, date collected, name of collector, and specimen number. Cover each specimen. There are no specific references given for these exhibits. Youth are encouraged to use Extension publications, the Internet, books, and forest specialists to develop these items.

Note: Your herbarium collection must be accessible to the judges. Do not cover it under the plastic that covers your poster. You may want to attach a folder or other holder over your poster to hold the mounted, covered specimens.

  • Herbarium Collection - Shrubs Collect 25 terminal twigs, with leaves attached, from native shrubs. Mount the specimens on 11 ½" x 16 ½" paper. One leaf on the twig must be mounted to show the back side of the leaf. Label each sheet with the following: common name, scientific name, where collected, county where collected, date collected, name of collector, and specimen number. Cover each specimen. There are no specific references given for these exhibits. Youth are encouraged to use Extension publications, the Internet, books, and forest specialists to develop these items.

Note: Your herbarium collection must be accessible to the judges. Do not cover it under the plastic that covers your poster. You may want to attach a folder or other holder over your poster to hold the mounted, covered specimens.




 
Level:Independent Study: Grades 9-12. One State Fair entry
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit

Advanced topic - Learn all you can about an Indiana or Eastern Deciduous forestry topic of your choice and present it on a poster. Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the works cited to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster, "Advanced Forestry - Independent Study."

Mentoring - Exhibit a poster that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Advanced Forestry - Mentor."




Garden

What is in it for me?
The gardening project introduces youth to vegetable gardening. The Gardening project is divided into four different levels:
Level A: See Them Sprout (3rd and 4th grades)
Level B: Let's Get Growing ( 5th and 6th grades)
Level C: Take Your Pick (7th-9th grades)
Level D: Growing Profits (10th-12th grades)
What can I learn?
You will learn about planning a vegetable garden, planting, fertilizing, different vegetable pests, harvesting, storage techniques and careers.
Exhibit Introduction

Note:
Posters are to be 22"x 28" displayed horizontally on hard backing.
Extra Exhibit Classes that may be offered in your county.
Largest (by weight) 1) pumpkin/squash 2) watermelon 3) tomato 4) potato 5) onion 6) head of cabbage 7) sunflower 8) unusual growth forms
Garden manuals:
See 4-H garden manuals and 4-H 970-W for suggestions in preparing exhibits.
Garden Manuals: BU-7162 - Level A; BU-7163, Level - B; BU-7164 - Level C; BU-7165 - Level D

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.

Poster Guidelines



Requirements

 
Level:All levels
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Read and study 4-H Garden manual(s).
  2. Plan your garden.
  3. Select plants and seeds.
  4. Plant your garden.
  5. Care for your garden.
  6. Harvest your produce.
  7. Exhibit your produce.
  8. Try something new, as listed in the manual.
  9. Keep a complete record of your garden activities.
  10. Complete activities as required in manual.
Exhibit

I. Single Vegetable
May be selected from 4-H Garden Publication 4-H 970-W (updated yearly) or list in the State Fair Premium book. Maximum of 5 different exhibits per exhibitor. Single vegetable entries should be labeled with common name of the vegetable and variety or cultivar of vegetable.

II. Garden Collection
Resource: 4-H 970-W and State Fair premium book
- three (3) plates
- four (4) plates
- five (5) plates
In all three classes, vegetables are to be exhibited on paper plates and may include a display of not less than three garden flowers, grown in your own garden. Exhibitors may each exhibit one collection (3 or 4 or 5 plate garden collection ) at State Fair. Garden collection entries should be labeled with common name, latin name, and variety.

III. Single Herb Exhibit
- Can enter three single herbs (all edible types) that must be labeled with common and Latin names and in pots 8" diameter maximum. (maximum of three different pots)
- Resource HO-28; 4-H 970-W
-For list of herbs acceptable for State Fair, see State Fair handbook or 4-H 970W.

IV. Garden Education
One garden education exhibit per county.

Anyone can complete Section IV (Garden Education), but members enrolled in Levels C and D of the garden project SHOULD exhibit one of the following activities in addition to the Produce Exhibit (Section I, II and III)

  1. Exhibit four (4) plates containing two cultivars of two different kinds of vegetables in your garden.
    For example: display tomato Rutgers and tomato Roma on two plates and spinach Melody and America on two plates. Label the cultivars you exhibit.
  2. Label and exhibit three unusual vegetables (may or may not be discussed in your 4-H Garden Manual) you grew in your garden this year. If not listed in the vegetable display chart, check with your Extension office.
    For example: spaghetti squash, head lettuce, cowpea, etc.
  3. Make a poster of five commonly found diseases in vegetable gardens, the damage caused by each, and the control options for each.
  4. Make a poster of five commonly found vegetable garden insects: beneficial (good guys) and/or injurious (bad guys), benefits or damage caused by each, and the related management practices (how to keep the beneficial, and how to control the injurious insects).
  5. Make a poster of a maximum of ten pests (diseases, insects, weeds and/or rodents) you found in your garden this year, damaged caused, control measures used, and results.
  6. Make a poster explaining a Computer Garden Program.
  7. Make a poster showing a picture story of what you did in your garden this year.
    Example: How you planned, planted, and maintained your garden.
  8. Make a poster showing your financial record for your garden.
  9. Make a poster of pictures showing your experiences in hydroponics.
  10. Make a poster explaining various career options working with vegetables/herbs and gardening.




Genealogy

Educational materials on "How to" information on documenting ones heritage through ancestral listing. The project can be done as an individual or group with a parent or grandparent. It helps young people know where their ancestors resided, traveled, and developed some family tradition.
Exhibit Introduction

Forms for this project are found on the Indiana 4-H Web site www.four-h.purdue.edu click on "projects" and then on Genealogy to reach downloadable forms. This project is organized into divisions and not grades for a youth cannot start in Division 3 without first completing Division 1 and Division 2. This is a project that builds on the previous division information in order to be successful in building your family tree. If you are using a genealogical commercial software program, you may need to type in or hand write in information required by the Indiana 4-H genealogy project. See 4-H forms on the 4-H website linked above. Since the current year's exhibit builds on the previous year’s data collection, only the current year's data collection is required for exhibition.

So the notebook exhibit can be displayed to the public and to minimize the potential of identity theft, original legal documents are NOT to be included in the exhibit notebook. Instead, a photocopy of any legal document is to be included in the notebook and all identifiable information (like social security numbers) except for names is to be completely marked out. Original legal documents are to be kept in a secure location by the 4-H member and his/her family.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.




Requirements

 
Level:Division 1
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • An Introduction page with a recent photograph of yourself.
    • Completed three-generation pedigree chart. This includes you, your parents, and your grandparents, ancestors #1 through #7. Put all surnames in capital letters and all dates in military form (12 July 1974). Give each person a number, as described in the "Recording the Information" section of the Indiana 4-H Genealogy Resource Guide 4-H 748. You must use the pedigree charts listed at the four-h.purdue.edu, 4-H 748Pc-W or 4-H 748Pbw-W or the commercial software forms, but not the old "packet" pedigree charts.
    • A Family Group Sheet for your parents and each pair of grandparents. Sources of information must be filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information").
    • Four (4) "Additional Information Worksheets":
      • one(1) for you, the 4-H member
      • one (1) for your parents
      • one (1) for each set of grandparents (total = two worksheets)
    • Any documents or pictures pertaining to these three generations. Documents must be labeled with ancestor name and ancestor number. Pictures need to be labeled with ancestor name, plus names of all known people, place and date picture was taken, as well as ancestor numbers.
    • A diary of your work.
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet.



Forms for this project are found on the Indiana 4-H Web site www.four-h.purdue.edu click on "projects" and then on Genealogy to reach downloadable forms. This project is organized into divisions and not grades for a youth cannot start in Division 3 without first completing Division 1 and Division 2. This is a project that builds on the previous division information in order to be successful in building your family tree. If you are using a genealogical commercial software program, you may need to type in or hand write in information required by the Indiana 4-H genealogy project. See 4-H forms on the 4-H website linked above.

Level:Division 2
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • Four-generation pedigree chart. This would include you, your parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents, ancestors #1 through #15. You must use the pedigree charts listed at four-h.purdue.edu, 4-H 748Pc-W or 4-H 748Pbw-W or the commercial software forms, but not the old "packet" pedigree charts
    • A Family Group Sheet for each pair of great-grandparents. Sources of information filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information" in the Indiana 4-H Genealogy Resource Guide 4-H 748).
    • An additional information worksheet for each set of great grandparents.
    • Any photographs taken of tombstones of your ancestors and their children. Please document location of tombstone(s) and label with ancestor name, ancestor number, and date photo was taken. Rubbings are acceptable in lieu of photographs.
    • Any other documents or pictures pertaining to these generations, correctly labeled.
    • A diary of your work.
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet.



Forms for this project are found on the Indiana 4-H Web site www.four-h.purdue.edu click on "projects" and then on Genealogy to reach downloadable forms. This project is organized into divisions and not grades for a youth cannot start in Division 3 without first completing Division 1 and Division 2. This is a project that builds on the previous division information in order to be successful in building your family tree. If you are using a genealogical commercial software program, you may need to type in or hand write in information required by the Indiana 4-H genealogy project. See 4-H forms on the 4-H website linked above.

Level:Division 3
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • Five-generation pedigree chart as in Division I, ancestors #1 through #31. Computer programs do not generally print chart numbers, so if you are using a computer program, make sure you have the correct number of ancestors. If an ancestor is UNKNOWN, please indicate as UNKNOWN. You must use the pedigree charts listed at four-h.purdue.edu, 4-H 748Pc-W or 4-H 748Pbw-W, or the commercial software forms, but not the old "packet" pedigree charts
    • Additional Family Group Sheets and information worksheets for generation five (5). Sources of information must be filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information" in Indiana 4-H Genealogy Resource Guide 4-H 748.).
    • Write an autobiography, the story of your life. Include pictures, relevant dates, and important events. OR, write an essay about what your hopes and dreams are for the future, or about life goals you hope to attain.
    • Any documents or pictures pertaining to these generations, correctly labeled.
    • A diary of your work.
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet.



 
Level:Division 4
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • Six-generation pedigree charts as in Division I, ancestors #1 through #63.Computer programs do not generally print chart numbers, so if you are using a computer program, make sure you have the correct number of ancestors. You must use the pedigree charts listed at four-h.purdue.edu, 4-H 748Pc-W or 4-H 748Pbw-W, or the commercial software forms, but not the old "packet" pedigree charts
    • Additional Family Group Sheets and information worksheets for generation six (6). Sources of information must be filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information").
    • A copy of a photograph or a story of a sixth-generation ancestor. Include information about the date when the photograph was taken, how or where you found it and what's happening in it or why it was taken. If this is unavailable, write a story about the historical period during which your sixth generation ancestor was living.
    • Any documents or pictures pertaining to these generations, correctly labeled.
    • A diary of your work.
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet



 
Level:Advanced Division
Last Modified: 11/21/07
Exhibit
  1. Exhibit a notebook(s) that includes the following:
    • Eight-generation pedigree charts, ancestors through # 255. Computer programs do not generally print chart numbers, so if you are using a computer program, make sure you have the correct number of ancestors.
    • Your family group sheet and additional information worksheets for generations seven and eight.
    • Sources of information filled in on family group sheets (see section "Recording the Information" in the Indiana 4-H Genealogy Resource Guide, 4-H 748).
    • One advanced level option (see below).
    • Any documents or pictures pertaining to these generations; correctly labeled.
    • A diary of your work
  2. Turn in a completed record sheet.

    Pedigree charts are available on the Indiana 4-H Web site for your additional genealogy research. Each year following, continue to add ancestors to your pedigree charts. In addition, choose one of the following options that has not been completed previously. Please identify, by letter, the option that you are completing (for example: Advanced Division, Year 1, Option A; Advanced Division, Year 2, Option C; etc.)

    1. A migration map of your eight-generation ancestors. You should have at least one map per family line with charts or explanations of the migrations.

    2. A timeline historical report of a family line. Show how this family fits into history. Document your report as well as possible with dates, records, places or maps, pictures, etc. Be sure to include proper labels and sources.

    3. A census history of a family line. Census abstract forms can be found on several websites. Download forms to abstract the census. Your notebook should contain copies of the census and the completed abstract form for each census.

    4. A history of your family's religious background for any family line or lines. Include a brief history of the denomination. Include baptism, confirmation or profession of faith and membership records. Also include information or history of the congregations involved. Be sure to include proper labels and sources.

    5. A history of your family's military service for a family line. Include supporting documents when possible. These documents could include military records, (muster rolls, discharge papers, etc.), pension records, and bounty land records, as well as maps and pictures. Be sure to include proper labels and sources.

    6. A research paper on a famous ancestor. Prove your relationship to this person with documentation. Try to include pictures and anecdotes to enhance your paper.

    7. Complete a family line or lines back as many generations as possible beyond eight generations. Include pictures, maps and documents. Be sure to include proper labels and sources.

    8. A timeline historical report of another family line not previously completed. Document as well as possible as in Option B. You need to state at the beginning that this is a second family historical report on such ancestor.

    9. A history of your family's military service for a family line not previously completed. Include supporting documents as in Option E. You need to state at the beginning that this is a second family military history report on such ancestor.

    10. Family DNA history. (This can be a very expensive option) Please include charts and explanations.




Geology

This project introduces youth to the fascinating hobby of "rock hunting." Geology involves studying the earth's crust, its layers, and their history. Youth learn to identify Indiana rocks, minerals, and fossils.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit to show the public some of the geology specimens you have collected. Exhibits must be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28," mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other), and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Or, you may display your specimens in an insect display box (18 x 24 inches), orientated horizontally. Include actual specimens in your exhibit, whenever possible. You can make your own labels for your specimens. See the suggested label format found in the Indiana 4-H geology manuals. Boxes make your specimens more secure. Do not put valuable specimens on posters where they can be removed quickly. Be sure to include a label with your name, grade, and county. Choose one of the topics listed below, appropriate for your grade in school, and use that name for your title. Titles must be in the front of the poster or box.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.

Notes:



Requirements

 
Level:Level 1: Grade 3-5 Manual 4-H 985. One State Fair entry per county
Last Modified: 10/01/12
Exhibit

Display a poster (or use an exhibit box) based on one of the following activities:

  • The Rock Cycle. (Activity 2). Explain the rock cycle using both words and pictures.
  • Rock Types (Activities 2-4). Display rocks from the three major types: igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic. Examples of each include: Igneous - granite, basalt, gabbro; Sedimentary - limestone, dolomite, shale, chert, gypsum; and Metamorphic - quartzite, schist, marble, slate.
  • How Rocks Change. (Activity 4). Color and display the picture in your book or draw and color your own on your poster. Briefly describe the earth processes that are shown.
  • Rock Artwork (Activity 12). Display your rock artwork and the story that you created.
  • Collections. (Activity 11). Display and identify 8 rocks.
  • Making Crystal Models. (Activities 14 & 15). Display the crystal forms characteristic of most minerals (cubic, tetragonal, hexagonal, orthorhombic, monoclinic, triclinic) in a display box with their name and mineral with this form. You may color, paint, or use markers on your crystal models.
  • Molds and Casts. (Activities 16 & 17). Display three molds and/or casts in a display box. Describe the steps that you followed to create a mold or cast.



 
Level:Level 2: Grades 6-8 Manual 4-H 986. One State entry per county.
Last Modified: 09/21/07
Exhibit

Display a poster (or use an exhibit box) based on one of the following activities:

  • Rocks with Different Textures. Identify and display six rocks with three very different textures (two rocks of each general type). Include three grades of sandpaper and show how the differences in sandpaper is similar to the differences in rock texture.
  • Indiana Limestone. Show and label pictures or photographs of ten buildings, sculptures, or monuments made from Indiana limestone.
  • Mineral properties and tests. Explain the characteristics: crystal form, cleavage, hardness, appearance, and streak. Explain tests used in identifying specimens. Examples you might include are streak, acid, hardness, chemical analysis, and specific gravity.
  • How We Use Minerals. Show 10 common products that contain minerals. Explain the minerals that are contained in these products and the characteristic that makes them useful.
  • Geologic Time. Create a display to show the major geologic eras. Indicate the names, specific features, and approximate length of each.
  • Indiana's Glaciers. Show the extent of Indiana's three main glaciers.
  • Indiana Geology. Exhibit a map or sketch of Indiana showing at least ten sites with interesting geological formations. Describe the formation and sketch or show a picture of the formation.
  • Field Trip. Describe a geology field trip that you took. Describe where you went and what you learned. Include photographs (if possible) or sketch what you saw.
  • Collections. Display and identify one of the following: 8-16 minerals, fossils, or 4-8 of each (half minerals and half fossils).You may exhibit a new collection in subsequent years but not one you have already exhibited.




 
Level:Level 3: Grades 9-12. Manual 4-H 987. One State Fair entry per county.
Last Modified: 09/01/06
Exhibit

Display a poster (or use an exhibit box) based on one of the following activities:

  • Geology Research. Prepare a display to teach others about the topic you studied. Include an appropriate title, abstract (brief description of your topic), and photographs, drawings, charts, or graphs that help explain your topic. This activity may be repeated if a new topic is chosen in subsequent years.
  • Lapidary and Jewelry. Show how stones and minerals are turned into polished stones and jewelry. Show and explain the steps involved.
  • Miniatures. Display five miniatures in a display box and explain the benefits of collecting miniatures and how they are prepared.
  • Indiana's State Parks or Forests. Create a matching game of Indiana's State Parks or Forests and a brief description.
  • Indiana, U.S, or World Geology. Teach others about one Indiana, U.S., or World Geology topic.
  • Career Exploration. Prepare a display that explains your interview with someone who needs an understanding of geology to do their job.



 
Level:Independent Study: Grades 9-12, one state fair entry
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit
  • Advanced topic - Learn all you can about a geology topic and present it on a poster. Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the works cited to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster, "Advanced Geology - Independent Study"
  • Mentoring - exhibit a poster that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Resources must be from educational or government entities. Title your poster, "Advanced Geology - Mentor."



Health

Health project
Exhibit Introduction

One State Fair exhibit per level.

All poster exhibits are to be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other) and covered in clear plastic or transparent material. Place standard identification label with your name, grade and county in the lower right-hand corner of the poster.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements

 
Level:Level A: First Aid in Action - Grade 3
Last Modified: 09/08/06
Exhibit Requirement Options
  • A poster on one of the following topics or any other topic covered in Level A:
    1. First Aid for Cuts and Scrapes
    2. First Aid for Choking
    3. First Aid for Strains, Sprains, and Bruises
  • A family first aid kit



 
Level:Level A: First Aid in Action -Grade 4
Last Modified: 09/08/06
Exhibit Requirement Options
  • A poster on one of the following topics or any other topic covered in Level A.
    1. First Aid for Treating Nosebleeds
    2. First Aid for Foreign Objects
    3. First Aid for Stings or Bites
  • A family first aid kit (including at least 1 Make Your Own item discussed in your 4-H manual



 
Level:Level A: First Aid in Action - Grade 5
Last Modified: 09/08/06
Exhibit Requirement Options
  • A poster on one of the following topics or any other topic covered in Level A:
    1. First Aid for Poisons
    2. First Aid for Broken Bones
    3. First Aid for Burns
  • A family kit for an emergency (tornado, snowstorm, no electricity, fire, etc.)



 
Level:Level B: Staying Healthy - Grade 6
Last Modified: 09/08/06
Exhibit Requirement Options
  • A poster on one of the following topics or any other topic covered in Level B:
    1. Human viruses or bacteria
    2. Keeping hair, skin, nails, teeth, ears or eyes clean
  • A report of three activities you completed in the 4-H manual



 
Level:Level B: Staying Healthy - Grade 7
Last Modified: 09/08/06
Exhibit Requirement Options
  • A poster on one of the following topics or any other topic covered in Level B.
    1. Nutrient rich "Power" foods
    2. Healthy snacks
    3. Appropriate portion sizes
  • A report of three activities you completed in the 4-H manual



 
Level:Level B: Staying Healthy - Grade 8
Last Modified: 09/08/06
Exhibit Requirement Options
  • A poster on one of the following topics or any other topic covered in Level B:
    1. The importance of eating breakfast
    2. The importance of physical activity
    3. Turning everyday activities into exercise opportunities
  • A report of three activities you completed in the 4-H manual



 
Level:Level C: Keeping Fit - Grade 9-12
Last Modified: 09/08/06
Exhibit Requirement Options
  • A poster on a topic covered in Keeping Fit: Fitness Activities for Youth
  • A report of three activities you completed in the 4-H manual



Home Environment

Educational materials applying principles of design to home design and decoration as well as information about care of home furnishings.
Exhibit Introduction

For the 4-H Home Environment project, 4-H members at each grade level may choose from three possible exhibit categories: a furniture item and notebook, a design board (poster and notebook), or a portfolio (notebook). All exhibits must include the Home Environment Exhibit Card, 4-H-1011-D-W. Level 3 participants will also have a fourth choice: independent study. NOTE: Each level has several options per category from which to choose. We suggest that 4-H members either choose a different option each year or show how they expanded on the same option (portfolio and furniture categories only) used in previous years.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.

Categories
Furniture Item and Notebook -- An actual piece of furniture accompanied by a standard notebook (3-ring binder) explaining the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the chosen project. We suggest including pictures showing where the item will be used. Also, we encourage 4-H members to include pictures of themselves doing the project, but this is not required. Always place your identification information in the notebook and on the furniture.

Design Board and notebook -- standard 22" x 28" poster, displayed horizontally with a firm backing. Design boards must be covered with plastic to protect and help hold items in place. An identification name tag must be attached in the lower right corner. The notebook is to help explain the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the chosen design. This can be a "before and after project" or "plan in the future" project.

Portfolio -- standard notebook (3-ring binder). If 4-H members choose to do this option more than one year, we suggest that they keep the previous year's materials in the notebook. Place materials for the current year in the front, with the previous year's materials clearly marked or labeled at the back. Always place your identification information in the notebook.

Other information:
Color samples -- These can be paint samples from a paint or hardware store, or color samples the 4-H member makes with paints or colored pencils.

Other samples -- Many hardware or home improvement stores have free samples of wall coverings, flooring, countertops, and cabinet materials that can be used with the 4-H member's design board or portfolio.

Colored pencils -- We suggest using colored pencils when coloring the design board or portfolio. Colored pencils are what professionals use! Keep in mind that the entire area does not need to be colored in, but be sure to apply enough color to adequately express design ideas. Other methods for coloring will also be accepted. These could include (but are not limited to): crayons, watercolor pencils, markers, or printing on the computer.



Requirements

 
Level:Level 1: Grades 3 - 5 (two State Fair exhibits from this level)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit

Manual: 4-H 1011 Home Environment: Color, Texture, Line, and Shape.

Furniture Options for Level 1
Exhibit any of the following items demonstrating color, texture, and/or line and shape that would help complete a room. Include your notebook. (See "Furniture Item and Notebook" explanation above.)

  • A hanging or wall hanging item.
  • A storage item or organizer item for room or the home.
  • 3 - 5 accessory items for your chosen room.

Design Board Options for Level 1

  • Color the line drawing found in 4-H 1011 Home Environment manual titled Color, Texture, Line, and Shape with colored pencils. Print a line drawing from the options available on the Indiana 4-H website: www.four-h.purdue.edu look under "projects" and then Home Environment. Create three different color schemes for the line drawing you have chosen. Label the type of color scheme used in each (e.g., monochromatic, analogous, complementary, warm, or cool). Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Color the line drawing found in 4-H 1011 Home Environment manual titled Color, Texture, Line, and Shape using one color option. Line drawings can be printed from the Indiana 4-H website: www.four-h.purdue.edu look under "projects" and then Home Environment. Use color to explain dominant and supportive colors. Attach color samples to identify two additional color options. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan for a bedroom showing line and shape where furniture would be placed (could be your own). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. We suggest using graph paper to help get the drawing close to scale and to show how line and shape work with the furniture. Include your 3-ring notebook.

Portfolio Options for Level 1

  • Collect samples of different color schemes (minimum of three), and label the type represented by each (e.g., monochromatic, analogous, complementary, warm, or cool).
  • Collect samples from magazines or photographs of formal vs. informal balance, dominant and supportive color, and use of pattern. Include comments explaining each.
  • Collect samples from magazines of three different furniture designs. Label each style (e.g., traditional, modern, country, formal, or retro). Include information explaining each style.



 
Level:Level 2: Grades 6-8 (two State Fair exhibits from this level)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit

Manual: Home Environment: Design Decisions (University of Nebraska). This one manual is to be used for grades 6 - 12 as a resource and a reference. Indiana 4-H exhibit options are not listed in the University of Nebraska manual. You are referred to the Indiana 4-H Youth Development website: www.four-h.purdue.edu or your local county 4-H handbook for exhibit option details.

Furniture Options for Level 2
Exhibit any of the following items demonstrating color, texture, and/or line and shape that would help complete a room. Include your notebook. (See "Furniture Item and Notebook" explanation above.)

  • One piece of furniture the 4-H member has refinished.
  • One piece of furniture the 4-H member has changed using decoupage, paint, fabric, etc.
  • One cushion or one 2-piece set of cushions, preferably made by the 4-H member, displayed with intended furniture
  • One window treatment, including picture of the treatment in use. (Should not be displayed on an actual window; use false walls or plywood no-glass window cutouts, or make special display rods.)
  • One piece of furniture that the 4-H member has reupholstered.
  • One item that you are using for a different purpose than it was originally designed for (e.g., bedsheet used to make a window treatment, drawer used as a wall shelf).
  • A collection of 3-5 similar items (baskets, wicker items, wicker furniture, bentwood furniture, etc.)  that you have made and/or purchased for future use.  (For example a collection of baskets made to use as desk accessories or bathroom accessories, outdoor furniture and accessories, etc.)

Design Board Options for Level 2

  • Display a floor plan for a living room, den, or family room. Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. We suggest using graph paper to help get the drawing close to scale and to show where the furniture would be placed. Include paint samples and/or wall-treatment samples. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan for a full bathroom (toilet, sink, and shower and/or bathtub). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the fixtures that would be used. We suggest using graph paper to help get the drawing close to scale and to show where the fixtures would go. Include paint samples and/or wall-treatment samples, and flooring samples. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan for a kitchen (including appliances and sink). Include pictures (magazine, appliance brochure, or photographs). We suggest using graph paper to help get the drawing close to scale and to show where the fixtures would go. Include paint samples and/or wall-treatment samples, flooring samples, and cabinet and/or countertop samples. Include your 3-ring notebook.

Portfolio Options for Level 2

  • Samples of three different types of wall treatments with an explanation for each. Examples can include but are not limited to: paint only, wallpaper only, or combination of paint and wallpaper.
  • Samples of three different floor treatments (pictures or flooring samples). Examples can include but are not limited to: hardwood, carpet, and/or tile. Include information on the advantages and disadvantages of each. Also include information on where it would be appropriate to use each flooring type.
  • Samples of three different cabinet/countertop combinations (pictures or samples). Examples can include but are not limited to: granite, laminate, and/or stainless steel. Include information about the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • An energy-savings plan. Design an energy-savings plan for your family's home or room(s). List the current energy use along with your plan to conserve energy. Plan should include techniques, how to conserve energy, cost savings, etc. You may add additional rooms or other plans to extend this option over a few years. Include each previous year's work, but be sure that you indicate which information represents the current year's work.



 
Level:Level 3: Grades 9 - 12 (two State Fair exhibits from this level)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Exhibit

Manual: Home Environment: Design Decisions (University of Nebraska). This one manual is to be used for grades 6–12 as a resource and a reference. Indiana 4-H exhibit options are not listed in the University of Nebraska manual. You are referred to the Indiana 4-H Youth Development website: www.four-h.purdue.edu or your local county 4-H handbook for exhibit option details.

Furniture Options for Level 3
Exhibit any of the following items demonstrating color, texture, and/or line and shape that would help complete your room along with your notebook. (See "Furniture Item and Notebook" explanation above.)

  • One piece of furniture the 4-H member has refinished.
  • One piece of furniture the 4-H member has changed using decoupage, paint, fabric, etc.
  • One cushion or one 2-piece set of cushions, preferably made by the 4-H member, displayed with intended furniture
  • One window treatment, including picture of the treatment in use. (Should not be displayed on an actual window; use false walls or plywood no-glass window cutouts, or make special display rods.)
  • One piece of furniture that the 4-H member has reupholstered.
  • One item that you are using for a different purpose than it was originally designed for (e.g., bedsheet used to make a window treatment, drawer used as a wall shelf).
  • A collection of 3-5 similar items (baskets, wicker items, wicker furniture, bentwood furniture, etc.)  that you have made and/or purchased for future use.  (For example a collection of baskets made to use as desk accessories or bathroom accessories, outdoor furniture and accessories, etc.)

Design Board Options for Level 3

  • Display a floor plan for a child's or teen's bedroom. Include a special "theme" appropriate for a child or teen (e.g., princess, cartoon character, music group, favorite book, or special hobby). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. Floor plan should be to scale with general measurements included. Include samples of window, wall, and flooring treatments. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan for a game room or family hobby room (e.g., room with pool table, ping pong table, and/or game table; home theater; or music room). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. Floor plan should be to scale with general measurements included. Include samples of window, wall, and flooring treatments. Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan of master suite (bedroom and bath). Include pictures (magazine or photographs) of the furniture that would be used. Floor plan should be to scale with general measurements included. Include samples of window, wall, and flooring treatments, etc. This exhibit must also include fabric samples (e.g., bedspread, window treatment). Include your 3-ring notebook.
  • Display a floor plan of a one- or two-bedroom home or apartment. Include color scheme samples and furniture layouts. Floor plan should be to scale with general measurements included. Window, wall, and flooring treatment samples should be included for each room. (Pictures of furniture are not a requirement.) Include your 3-ring notebook.

Portfolio Options for Level 3

  • Samples of three different lighting treatments. Explain how and when each is appropriate for use. Examples include but are not limited to: overhead, recessed, and table/floor lamps. Include information as it relates to energy use and efficiency.
  • Samples of three different types of window treatments. Include information on the use of each kind and in what room each would be appropriate. Include information on the advantages/disadvantages of each. Also, include information as it relates to energy use and efficiency.
  • Using the same window (size and shape), apply three different types of window treatments. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of each. Explain what type of setting (formal, country, traditional, modern, etc.) would be appropriate for each treatment. Include information related to energy use and efficiency.
  • A career plan. Interview an interior designer. Include the advantages and disadvantages of being a professional interior designer. Research two different design schools or training programs. Include the advantages and disadvantages of each program. Include the cost of attaining a degree or completing the program.
  • An energy-savings plan. Design an energy-savings plan for your family's home or room(s). List the current energy use along with your plan to conserve energy. Plan should include techniques, how to conserve energy, cost savings, etc. You may add additional rooms or other plans to extend this option over a few years. Include each previous year's work, but be sure that you indicate which information represents the current year's work.

Independent Study Option for Level 3
Youth in grades 9 - 12 have the option of doing an independent study project. Those 4-H members who choose this option must review their ideas with their 4-H Youth Development Extension Educator and/or Home Environment project leader to make sure they have selected an appropriate topic/exhibit.




Llamas (Llamas alpacas)

The 4-H Llama Project (Llama & Alpacas) provides youth a fun and hands-on learning experience that develops life skills, as well as teaches valuable information about properly caring for their animal. An important objective of this project is for the 4-H member to experience the pride of owning / leasing a lLlama or alpaca, gaining it's trust and being responsible for its care. The 4-H project books are organized into the following five subjects:
  1. Know Your Llama: History, Background, and Characteristics;
  2. Anatomy: Structure / Conformation, Fiber, and Parts;
  3. Health, Maintenance and Facilities;
  4. Training and Showing;
  5. Use, Marketing, and Careers.
Youth also have the opportunity to develop responsibility, decision-making, nurturing, and communication skills through active participation in the 4-H Llama Project. In addition to owning / leasing a lLlama or alpaca, 4-H members can also participate in the Llama Poster project and the Llama Craft projects.


Exhibit Introduction



It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements

 
Level:For all levels
Last Modified: 10/01/13
  • Llama Exhibition Classes

All Llamas and alpacas must be enrolled on the online animal enrollment system by May 15 to be eligible to participate in the Indiana State Fair Llama and Alpaca show. Contact your county extension office regarding county animal enrollment requirements.

  • Llama Poster Educational Exhibit
    • Posters will be judged on theme, construction, style and language. Posters must have been constructed within one (1) year of exhibit and must follow general state poster guidelines
    • Each poster must have been made by the 4-H member enrolled in the current year's 4-H program.
    • Size - 22" x 28", displayed horizontally with stiff backing and covered with plastic accompanied by a name tag in the lower front right hand corner.
    • Standards of evaluation:
      • content and information (accuracy and completeness) - 40 points
      • originality and creativity (attracts interest, encourages thought) - 25 points
      • overall appearance/appealing (neatness, arrangement, background, workmanship, attention to detail) - 15 points
      • suitable subject and age appropriate (matches child's age and ability) - 10 points
      • conveys message/accomplishes purpose - 5 points
      • meets exhibit requirements - 5 points
      • Total - 100 points
  • Llama Craft Exhibit
    • Llama/Alpaca Fiber Crafts - Exhibit will be judged on craftsmanship only. Crafts must have been made within one (1) year of exhibit. Any craft item constructed with llama or alpaca fiber may be entered. Craft may also contain other materials. Fiber may be processed (felted, spun, etc.) or unprocessed, and may be originated from any llama or alpaca. Exhibits will consist of one (1) completed craft item, which can be a single item or a set, and a notebook explaining how the craft was made.



Personality

Series of educational materials and activities that promotes individuals learning about themselves, their friends, families, and communities.
Exhibit Introduction


It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.


Requirements



 
Level:Level A (Grades 3 and 4)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Project Completion Recommendations

1. Read and study workbook.

2. Complete 2 - 3 activities in the workbook or complete 1 - 2 optionals for a total of 3 activities for the grade level.

3. Turn this workbook in to be checked or graded according to the county requirements

Exhibit

*A 22" x 28" horizontal poster explaining one or more of the units in this workbook.




 
Level:Level B (Grades 5 and 6)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Project Completion Recommendations

1. Read and study this workbook.

2. Complete 2 - 3 activities in the workbook or complete 1 - 2 optionals for a total of 3 activities for the grade level.

3. Turn this workbook in to be check or graded according to the county requirements.

Exhibit

*A 22" x 28" horizontal poster explaining one or more of the units in this workbook.




 
Level:Level C (Grades 7, 8, and 9)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Project Completion Recommendations

1. Read and study this workbook.

2. Complete 2 - 3 activities in the workbook or complete 1 - 2 optionals for a total of 3 activities for the grade level.

3. Turn this workbook in to be checked or graded according to the county requirements.

Exhibit

*Grade 7 - A 22" x 28" horizontal poster highlighting one community service organization in the community.

*Grade 8 - Develop a brochure explaining the organization mission, purpose, and goals for one community service organization in the community include in a three-ring binder notebook and include how others benefit from this organization's services.

*Grade 9 - A community resource guide in a binder notebook




 
Level:Level D (Grades 10, 11, and 12)
Last Modified: 10/01/10
Project Completion Recommendations

1. Read and study the workbook and other references (check at your libraries for books and magazines).

2. Complete 2 - 3 activities in the workbook for the grade level.

3. Turn your workbook in to be checked or graded according to county requirements.

Exhibit
*Grade 10 - A 22" x 28" poster or display board or a binder notebook describing three possible careers.

*Grade 11 - A binder notebook displaying a monthly budget for three months--income and expenses to live on your own .

*Grade 12 - A binder notebook holding an employment portfolio.




Poultry

The 4-H Poultry Project provides youth a fun and hands-on learning experience that develops life skills, as well as teaches valuable information about properly caring for their birds. Subjects such as such as general care, nutrition housing, and health care are presented in the curricular materials, through workshops and activities such as poultry judging, and in preparation of an exhibit. Youth also have the opportunity to develop responsibility, decision-making, nurturing, and communication skills through active participation in the 4-H Poultry Project.
Requirements

 
Level:All levels (Level 1, 2 and 3)
Last Modified: 10/04/05
Exhibit Requirement Options
  • One or more birds fed and cared for by member
  • Complete number of suggested activities listed in the member's guide as per county guidelines.
  • Contact County Extension Office for enrollment information and form(s)
  • Display Boards for Poultry Posters and Poultry Science Project displays – optional at county level.  Develop an idea and build it into an attractive display as well as learn the technical aspect of some part of the poultry industry. Any 4-H poultry project member may exhibit a poster. display board. Display boards Posters must be 22” x 28” displayed horizontally. It is recommended/suggested that all posters include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.
    Check with county extension office regarding specific county exhibits guidelines.

For State Fair:

  1. Exhibits must be entered on the State Fair activity form (available from the County Extension Office) and the form signed by the respective Extension educator.
  2. Each exhibit must be clearly labeled in the lower right hand corner with the 4-H’ers name. (Appropriate State Fair labels may be obtained from County Extension Office.)
  3. A standard 22” x 28” 4-H poster is preferred for display boards Posters are to be 22” x 28” and displayed horizontal, but a 3-dimensional exhibit is preferred for poultry science projects. Poultry science displays must occupy a space no larger than 30” deep x 48” wide x 72” high.
  4. 4-H display boards posters and poultry science projects will be on public display in the 4-H Exhibit Hall throughout the Fair.
  5. All exhibits will be released from the 4-H Exhibit Hall.
  6. Each county may enter one (1) junior, one (1) intermediate and one (1) senior exhibit in both display boards posters and the poultry science project. Junior exhibit for 4-H members in the 3rd, 4th or 5th grade on January 1 of the current year. Intermediate exhibit for 4-H members in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade on January 1 of the current year. Senior exhibit for 4-H members in the 9th grade or above on January 1 of the current year.

 

 




Shooting Sports

The 4-H shooting sports project teaches safe operation of firearms and archery equipment. Volunteer instructors must be certified at a workshop. Six disciplines are offered at the state level: archery, outdoor skills, muzzle loading, pistol, rifle, and shotgun. The disciplines offered in any county will depend on the availability of certified 4-H shooting sports instructors to teach the classes, ranges, and equipment.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in shooting sports education this year. Exhibits must be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other), and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Be sure to include a label with your name, grade, and county. Title your exhibit with one of the following: archery, hunting outdoor skills, muzzleloading, pistol, rifle, shotgun, or shooting sports. You can use a subtitle, if you wish.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.

Important Notes:

  • Firearms or bows are not allowed to be exhibited
  • Live ammunition is not allowed to be exhibited (no powder or primer)
  • Modern broadhead arrows are not allowed to be exhibited
  • Arrows and arrowheads must be displayed in a case
  • Displays involving firearms or bows may be exhibited as a photographic display on a poster or in a notebook following grade level guidelines.
  • Handmade items must include information explaining how the project was made and its intended use. Photos are encouraged.


Requirements

 
Level:Grades 3 through 5 (May have one State Fair entry per county)
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Exhibit
Display a poster showing what was learned in the 4-H Shooting Sports project.



 
Level:Grades 6 through 8 (May have one State Fair entry per county.)
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Exhibit

Choose one of the following options. Exhibits MUST meet the size restrictions or be presented in a notebook.

  1. Poster
  2. Small project or model no larger than 18 x 18 x 36 inches.
  3. Notebook, showing how a shooting sports item was made, or project completed.



 
Level:Grades 9 through 12 (May have one State Fair entry per county.)
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Exhibit
Choose one of the following options.
  1. Poster.
  2. Project or model (any size)
  3. Notebook, showing how a shooting sports item was made, or project completed.



 
Level:Independent Study: Grades 9 - 12, one State Fair entry
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit

Advanced topic - Learn all you can about an advanced shooting topic and present it on a poster and/or in a notebook. Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the works cited to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster, "Advanced Shooting Sports - Independent Study"

Mentoring - exhibit a poster that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Advanced Shooting Sports - Mentor.




Small Engine

Small Engine project
Exhibit Introduction

Note: The following poster/display requirements and small engine display requirements apply to exhibits for all three levels.

Poster Requirements:

Actual Engine Display:

  • Size 22" x 28"
  • Mounted on stiff backing foamboard, thin plywood, peg board or very stiff cardboard
  • Displayed horizontally.
  • Covered in plastic
  • 4-H Member identification card; i.e., name, club, county, and level

The actual small engine may be displayed. It must be mounted on a stable base no large than 30" x 30". For safety reasons, all fluids (fuel and oil) must be removed. Note: It is strongly suggested that a notebook with details and pictures of what was done to the engine accompany the display



It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.


Requirements



 
Level:Level 1 (Grade 3, 4, and 5)
Last Modified: 07/08/05
Suggested Fair Exhibit Guidelines

Educational display: Any educational display related to what you have learned in this project. Some possibilities of exhibits might include:

  • Picture poster showing what you have learned about small engines.
  • Display of basic tools needed to maintain a small engine.
  • An educational display related to what you have learned about two-cycle engines.
  • An educational display related to what you have learned about four-stroke engines.
  • An educational display showing proper maintenance and care of a lawn mower.
  • An educational display of proper safety labels and procedures for small engines.
  • Small engines parts display board with a brief explanation of the purpose of the parts and how they work.
  • Display related to some system that you learned about in small engines (filters, cooling, ignition, etc.).



 
Level:Level 2 (Grade 6, 7, and 8)
Last Modified: 07/08/05
Suggested Fair Exhibit Guidelines

Educational display: Any educational display related to what you have learned in this project. Some possibilities of exhibits might include:

  • An educational display comparing the different types of engines.
  • An educational poster illustrating and explaining the internal parts of an engine.
  • An educational display showing how transmissions work.
  • An educational display showing how to conduct a compression check.
  • An educational display showing how to adjust a carburetor.
  • A display using a real small engine with a brief explanation showing steps in preparing a small engine for storage.
  • Carburetor parts display board with a brief explanation of the purpose of the parts and how they work together.
  • An income and expense record of your lawn mowing business, including costs, hours worked, pay for individual jobs, etc.



 
Level:Level 3 (Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12)
Last Modified: 07/08/05
Suggested Fair Exhibit Guidelines

Educational display: Any educational display related to what you have learned in this project. Some possibilities of exhibits might include:

  • An educational display showing how to use diagnostic tools on small engines.
  • An educational display showing how to tear down and reassemble a small engine.
  • An educational display related to the electrical system of a small engine.
  • An educational display about emissions systems on small engines and future trends.
  • An educational display showing how to remove and sharpen a mower blade.
  • An educational display about careers in small engines.
  • An educational display about your work in finding resources about small engines on the Internet.
  • An educational display about trouble-shooting common problems with small engines.
  • An educational display about small engines designs.
  • Any educational display related to what you have learned in this project.



Soil and Water Science

The soil and water science project teaches youth about soil, water, and environmental stewardship . Learn about soil and water quality, how they interact, and how we can protect and preserve them.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the soil and water science project this year.  Poster exhibits must be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28" foam-core board or poster board mounted on a firm backing, and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Notebook exhibits must be displayed in a standard three ring binder. Choose one of the options listed below, appropriate for your grade in school. Use an appropriate exhibit title. Be sure to include a label with your name, grade, 4-H club, and county in the lower right hand corner.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements

 
Level:Level 1
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit
  • A poster related to an activity from the level 1 manual
  • A poster and/or notebook of a soil or water related science experiment appropriate for grades 3-5



 
Level:Level 2
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit
  • A poster related to an activity from the level 2 manual
  • A poster and/or notebook of a soil or water related science experiment appropriate for grades 6-8





 
Level:Level 3
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit
  • A poster related to an activity from the level 3 manual
  • A poster and/or notebook of a soil or water related science experiment appropriate for grades 9-12
  • Independent Study -Learn all you can about a soil and/or water topic, program, facility, project, etc. and present it on a poster or in a notebook. Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the works cited to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster or notebook, "Advanced Soil and Water Science -Independent Study"
  • Mentoring -Exhibit a poster or notebook that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Advanced Soil and Water Science -Mentor."




Soybeans

What is in it for me?
The Soybean project introduces you to one of Indiana's major crops, the soybean through fun experiences and hands-on projects.
What can I learn?
You will lean about selecting soybean varieties, planting soybeans, uses for soybeans and harvesting soybeans.
Exhibit Introduction


It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.


Requirements



 
Level:Division 1
Last Modified: 07/12/05
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Complete three of the following activities: 1, 2, 3 or 13 in the 4-H Soybean Manual.
  2. Keep accurate records using the 4-H Crops Record.
Exhibit

Exhibit on "Germination Of The Soybean," or "Using The Soybean," or one peck of soybeans at the county level.




 
Level:Division 2
Last Modified: 07/12/05
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Complete two of the following activities: 4, 7 or 14 in the 4-H Soybean Manual.
  2. Keep accurate records using the 4-H Crops Record
Exhibit

Exhibit on "The Effects of Light and Darkness On Flowering," or "Soybean Plant Nutrient Deficiencies," or "Preparing Soybeans for Home Use," or one peck of soybeans at the county level.




 
Level:Division 3
Last Modified: 07/12/05
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Complete two of the following activities: 5, 6, or 14 in the 4-H Soybean Manual.
  2. 2. Keep accurate records using the 4-H Crops Record.
Exhibit

Exhibit on "Differences In Flowering among Soybean Varieties," or "How Planting Dates Affect Soybean Yields," or "Preparing Soybeans for Home Use," or one peck of soybeans at the county level.




 
Level:Division 4
Last Modified: 07/12/05
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Complete the following activities: 9, 10, 11 and 12 in the Soybean Manual.
  2. Keep accurate records using the 4-H Crops Record.
Exhibit

Exhibit on "Soybean Herbicide Survey," or "Soybean Insect Study," or "Soybean Disease Study," or "Measuring Soybean Harvest Losses," or one peck of soybeans at the county level.




 
Level:Division 5 and advanced
Last Modified: 07/12/05
Project Completion Recommendations
    Grow at least five acres of soybeans using cultural practices described in current agronomy (AY) publications. These are available in your County Extension Office.
  1. Keep accurate records using the 4-H Crops Record.
Exhibit

Check with your 4-H leader about specific county exhibit requirements.




Sportfishing

Fishing can be a hobby and a source of study for your entire lifetime. The 4-H sportfishing project will introduce you to fish, fishing, and aquatic habitats.
Exhibit Introduction
Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the sport fishing project this year. Posters are displayed horizontally, 22" x 28," and mounted on a firm backing and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Be sure to include your exhibit label with your name, grade, and county. Choose one of the topics listed below, appropriate for your grade in school, and create a poster based on what you learned from the activity. Use that topic for your exhibit title, so the judges know which activity you completed. You can also use a creative sub-title if you wish.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.


Requirements



 
Level:Level 1 (Grade 3 to 5) 4-H BU-7598. One State Fair entry per county.
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit

Exhibit a poster based on one of the following activities:

Let's Go Fishing! Complete the Angling Self Assessment and practice landing a fish as described in Playing a Fish. Display your self assessment to show what you currently know about fishing and indicate what you hope to learn in this project. Draw or take photos of you "Playing a Fish."
Pop Can Casting Display a photo of you casting your pop can rig and your casting record. Optional - display a photo of you casting a regular fishing rig and your casting record with that rig.
Hook, Line, and Sinker Display at least two the rigs listed in Fishing Deeper, #1. You can use a drawing or a picture to show these rigs. Answer the questions (Casting Out, Working the Lure, Setting the Hook, and Landing the Fish) on your exhibit.
Fishy Baits Complete and display cards similar to those shown (natural baits, prepared bait, and artificial flies and lures). Answer the Casting Out questions on your exhibit.
Which Fish is it? Copy the pages in your manual and use the fish and the crossword puzzle. Identify the fish and make a display that shows the correct answers in the puzzle. (Optional - enlarge the crossword puzzle).



 
Level:Level 2 (Grade 6 to 8) 4-H BU-7599. One State Fair entry per county.
Last Modified: 09/01/06
Exhibit

Exhibit a poster based on the following activities:

A Different Spin Display a picture of you while casting and a completed Casting Record and Spinning Reel Parts diagram. Also, answer the Working the Lure and Setting the Hook questions. (You may copy the ones in your manual or make your own.)
A Fine Kettle of Fish Show a drawing or photograph of you cooking fish. Include your recipe and, if possible, pictures of you cleaning and/or cooking your fish.
Clean up the Litterbug Complete and display the chart shown on page 16. Draw or take a photo of the fishing place that you cleaned up (before and after).
The Woolly Bugger Take pictures or make drawings to show how a woolly bugger is made. Answer the Casting Out and Working the Lure questions.
A Fish by Design Draw, take pictures, or find pictures on the Internet or in magazines to show (and identify) different mouth/feeding fish, body shapes, and fish with different coloration. Briefly explain (3-5 sentences or bullet points) why fish have different mouths, body shapes, and coloration.  



 
Level:Level 3 (Grade 9 to 12) 4-H BU-7600. One State Fair entry per county.
Last Modified: 09/21/07
Exhibit

Exhibit a poster based on the following activities:

A Reel Mess Draw, take photos, or copy the reels shown in Cleaning a Reel. Label the reels, the parts of each reel, and where you might use it. Show how you cleaned a reel using pictures or drawings.
Designing a Skillathon Station Make two skillathon stations (you may use the suggestions on page 9 or another fishing topic of your choice). List the topic, realistic situation, task, and materials needed. Take photographs of younger 4-H members using your stations.
Beads, Dog Hair, and Feathers Collect materials and tie a fly. You can display your fly or a picture of the fly. Also, list and draw or take pictures of the 7 materials in the matching game and indicate their potential use.
Collecting Aquatic Insects Complete and display the chart on page 18 (you may copy the chart in your book or make your own). Draw or take pictures of your kick net and your sampling procedures. Answer the questions in Casting Out and Working the Lure.
Cast Into the Future Complete the Career Investigation Record after talking with someone currently working in an area related to fish or fishing. Include a picture of the person you interviewed and answer the questions in Casting Out, Working the Lure, Setting the Hook, and Landing the Fish.
Keep a Field Journal Reproduce or copy 3-5 Field Journal entries on your display. Include photographs that show where you had the fishing experience, if possible.
Playing Know Your Fish Make a "flap" quiz to teach fish facts. Show a picture or ask a question about a fish. Give the answer(s) under the flap. Choose 5 - 10 fish using at least 5 fish from your manual. Be sure to list multiple species if the information you provide applies to more than one of the species you choose.



 
Level:Independent Study: Grades 9 - 12, One State Fair entry
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit
Advanced Topic Learn all you can about a sport fishing topic of your choice and present it on a poster.  Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the references you used to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster, "Advanced Sport Fishing - Independent Study"
Mentoring Exhibit a poster that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Advanced Sport Fishing - Mentor."



Verbal Communication Events and Activities

Effective communications drives all aspects of day-to-day life. Youth are to learn about the process of communications, to learn about different modes of communications and to strengthen their own communications skills. As you explore the world of communications and the manuals, you will enjoy learning more about yourself and others.

In the Indiana 4-H Youth Development program, we offer a few avenues to learn and build skills on communications with others. The following verbal communication events and activities are offered to 4-H members as a way to teach presentation and public speaking skill development. They are often used in 4-H meetings, and a county 4-H youth development program may choose to offer these as competitive events. While the interactive demonstration is a non-competitive event at the Indiana State Fair, the demonstration, informative presentation, professional persuasive presentation, public speaking, and illustrated talk are competitive events. Refer to the Indiana State Fair 4-H handbook for the date, time, and location of each event. Check with your county extension educator for information about entering these events and activities.

  • Interactive demonstration
  • Demonstration
  • Informative 4-H Presentation
  • Professional Persuasive Presentation
  • Public Speaking
  • Illustrated Talk

 


Exhibit Introduction

The following verbal communication events and activities are offered to 4-H members as a way to teach presentation and public speaking skill development. They are often used in 4-H meetings, and a county 4-H youth development program may choose to offer these as competitive events. While the interactive demonstration is a non-competitive event at the Indiana State Fair, the demonstration, informative presentation, professional persuasive presentation, public speaking, and illustrated talk are competitive events. Refer to the Indiana State Fair 4-H handbook for the date, time, and location of each event. Check with your county extension educator for information about entering these events and activities.

 



Requirements

 
Level:Interactive Demonstration
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Interactive Demonstration
  • Any 4-H member may participate in the Interactive Demonstration.
  • This is designed for the novice person, and the topic can be related to any 4-H project. The 4-H member will provide a short demonstration of no more than 3 minutes that will actively engage members of the audience in a how-to-do skill development.
  • Examples include, but are not limited to, how to use a measuring cup, how to use a ruler, how to knead dough, how to clean grooming clippers, how to crop a photo, etc.
  • Props are permitted.
  • Live animals and PowerPoint displays are not permitted.
  • Although participants will not be judged, an adult will watch the 4-H member’s interactive demonstration and will provide feedback to the member.
  • The 4-H member will continually repeat their how-to interactive demonstration for the designated time period, typically 45-60 minutes.



 
Level:Demonstration
Last Modified: 10/01/13

Demonstration

  • Any 4-H member in grades 6-12 may participate in the Indiana State Fair demonstration contest.
  • This contest allows the 4-H member to show the audience step-by-step procedures how to do something related to any project:
  • Examples of a demonstration include how to take a prize winning photograph, how to give an intramuscular antibiotic injection or shot, how to design a mini-barn blueprint, how to construct a garment, how to develop a wildlife rehabilitation plan, how to treat a cat for fleas, etc.
  • Members may use a PowerPoint, Prezi, or other digital presentation, signs, and other props that will enhance their presentation when giving their how-to demonstration to the audience from a stage or stage-like setting.
  • If digital media will be used to enhance the presentation, contestants are encouraged to provide their own laptop computer. If the laptop is not equipped with a standard VGA external video connection, the contestant will need to supply an appropriate adapter. While a standard PC laptop will be available, the quality and compatibility of the digital media cannot be guaranteed as PowerPoint will be the only digital media available.
  • Live animals are not permitted.
  • There is no interaction with the audience.
  • Junior members (grades 6-8) have 5-7 minutes to present their demonstration, while senior members (grades 9-12) will present their demonstration in 5-10 minutes.
  • Questions may be asked of the contestants by the judges following the demonstration.
  • Categories will be Junior Individual, Senior Individual, Junior Team, and Senior Team.
  • The team category is for two (2) people and will be determined by the highest grade level of any member of that team. If a team is awarded the State Fair Achievement Trip, only those team members who are 14 years of age or older as of January 1 will be permitted to attend the trip. Those members of the winning team who are younger than 14 years of age will not be able to compete in a team demonstration in future years.
  • The State Fair Achievement Trip may be awarded by the judges to a maximum of the top three (3) blue merit senior individual members and top (1) blue merit senior team at the discretion of the judges. Trip winners must be of blue merit quality.
  • A county may have no more than three (3) entries in each of these categories.



 
Level:Informative 4-H Presentation
Last Modified: 10/01/13

Informative 4-H Presentation

  • Any 4-H member in grades 6-12 may participate in the Indiana State Fair informative presentation contest.
  • This contest allows the 4-H member to present a topic of their choice related to a 4-H event, project, or activity to the audience.
  • Examples of an informative 4-H presentation include the benefits of attending 4-H Round-Up, State 4-H Junior Leader Conference, Science Workshops, or Citizenship Washington Focus; the impact of a community service project on the 4-H members involved and their community; why a family should enroll their children in 4-H; how 4-H prepares a young person for the workforce or college, etc.
  • Members may use a PowerPoint, Prezi, or other digital presentation, signs, and other props that will enhance their presentation when giving it to the audience from a stage or stage-like setting. If digital media will be used to enhance the presentation, contestants are encouraged to provide their own laptop computer. If the laptop is not equipped with a standard VGA external video connection, the contestant will need to supply an appropriate adapter. While a standard PC laptop will be available, the quality and compatibility of the digital media cannot be guaranteed as PowerPoint will be the only digital media available.
  • Live animals are not permitted.
  • There is no interaction with the audience.
  • Junior members (grades 6-8) have 5-7 minutes to present their informative presentation, while senior members (grades 9-12) will present their informative presentation in 5-10 minutes.
  • Questions may be asked of the contestants by the judges following the informative 4-H presentation.
  • Categories will be Junior Individual, Senior Individual, Junior Team, and Senior Team.
  • The team category is for two (2) people and will be determined by the highest grade level of any member of that team. If a team is awarded the State Fair Achievement Trip, only those team members who are 14 years of age or older as of January 1 will be permitted to attend the trip. Those members of the winning team who are younger than 14 years of age will not be able to compete in a team informative presentation in future years.
  • The State Fair Achievement Trip may be awarded by the judges to a maximum of the top three (3) blue merit senior individual members and top (1) blue merit senior team at the discretion of the judges. Trip winners must be of blue merit quality.
  • A county may have no more than three (3) entries in each of the categories.



 
Level:Professional Persuasive Presentation
Last Modified: 10/01/13

Professional Persuasive Presentation

  • Any 4-H member in grades 6-12 may participate in the Indiana State Fair professional presentation contest.
  • Contestants will be required to research a public issue in their community, collect data showing how this issue is or could affect their community, formulate a plan to address this issue, and present it in a professional manner using electronic digital media such as PowerPoint, Prezi, etc.
  • Contestants are to submit three (3) sets of accompanying handouts at registration. These handouts should not just be a copy of the presentation, but are to include supporting documentation (graphs, charts) photos, etc.) and will be provided to the judges.
  • It is suggested that youth practice by presenting their professional presentation to service clubs, 4-H council or fair board, government officials, or other boards.
  • Examples of public issues could be the lack of accessibility to trails or public parks, congested traffic locations, public health issues, impoverished neighborhoods, school dropout rates, the size of farm machinery outgrowing the size of roads, etc.
  • Members must use a PowerPoint, Prezi, or other digital media presentation when giving it to the audience from a stage or stage-like setting.
  • Other props may be used to enhance the presentation but are not required.
  • Live animals are not permitted.
  • There is no interaction with the audience.
  • Junior members (grades 6-8) and senior members (grades 9-12) will present their professional presentation in 5-10 minutes.
  • Questions may be asked by the judges following the professional presentation. Categories will be Junior Individual and Senior Individual.
  • There is no team category in the professional persuasive presentation contest. Teams will be added for Junior and Senior in 2015.
  • Contestants are encouraged to provide their own laptop computer. If the laptop is not equipped with a standard VGA external video connection, the contestant will need to supply an appropriate adapter. While a standard PC laptop will be available, the quality and compatibility of the digital media cannot be guaranteed as PowerPoint will be the only digital media available. A wireless internet connection will be available.
  • The State Fair Achievement Trip may be awarded by the judges to a maximum of the top three (3) blue merit senior individual members at the discretion of the judges. Trip winners must be of blue merit quality.
  • A county may have no more than three (3) entries in each of the categories.



 
Level:Public Speaking
Last Modified: 10/01/13

Public Speaking

  • Any 4-H member in grades 6-12 may participate in the Indiana State Fair public speaking contest.
  • This contest allows the 4-H member to give their prepared speech to an audience from a stage or stage-like setting.
  • There is no interaction with the audience.
  • Props, signs, and PowerPoint presentations are not permitted.
  • The topic can be of the 4-H member’s choice and but must be related to 4-H.
  • Junior members (grades 6-8) have 3-5 minutes to give their speech while senior members (grades 9-12) will give their speech in 5-7 minutes.
  • Questions may be asked by the judges following the speech.
  • The State Fair Achievement Trip may be awarded by the judges to a maximum of the top three (3) blue merit senior individual members at the discretion of the judges. Trip winners must be of blue merit quality.
  • A county may have no more than three (3) entries in each category.



 
Level:Illustrated Talk
Last Modified: 10/01/13

Illustrated Talk

  • An illustrated talk is offered at the Indiana State Fair in poultry and rabbits.
  • All participants must complete the Indiana State Fair Rabbit or Poultry entry form. This completed form is to be submitted to the rabbit or poultry barn office, respective to the contest, at check-in. There is no Indiana State Fair entry fee for this event.
  • Categories will be Novice (grades 3-4), Junior (grades 5-6), Intermediate (grades 7-8), Senior (grades 9-10), and Master (grades 11-12).
  • An illustrated talk is for any 4-H member and allows the member to present a 5-7 minute speech to the audience on a topic related to that project while using props and/or a PowerPoint, Prezi, or other digital presentation.
  • There is no interaction with the audience.
  • Check the Indiana State Fair 4-H Premium book for the time, date, and location of this event.
  • Entries will be accepted through the county Purdue Extension office or on-site at the poultry or rabbit show for the respective event. Check the Indiana State Fair 4-H Premium book for the time, location, and deadline to enter if entering on-site.
  • Live animals that would be eligible to show in that project may be used in the illustrated talk.
  • The State Fair Achievement Trip may be awarded by the judges to a maximum of the top two (2) blue merit Masters Category rabbit members and poultry members at the discretion of the judges. Trip winners must be of blue merit quality.




Veterinary Science

The 4-H Veterinary Science Project provides youth a fun and hands-on learning experience that helps them learn more about the Veterinary Science profession, and opportunities for careers in animal health. Subjects such as general health care, physiology, anatomy and careers are presented in the curricular materials, through workshops such as Science Workshops for Youth, and through hands on experiences with local veterinarians. Youth also have the opportunity to develop responsibility, decision making and communication skills through active participation in the 4-H Veterinary Science Project.
Exhibit Introduction
4-H veterinary science exhibits should be educational in nature covering one (1) or more of the topics presented in the members' manual and/or found in the 4-H Veterinary Science Leaders Guide. An educational exhibit is one that should be able to teach other people about your topic. Chose a topic you think is interesting and apply your imagination. All 4-H members developing veterinary science 4-H fair exhibits should consult with their 4-H veterinary science leaders for further details, helpful ideas, and additional sources for reference.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.


Requirements



 
Level:Veterinary Science 1 (Grades 3-5)
Last Modified: 10/04/05
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Read and complete county determined number of activities.
  2. Attend county workshops, when available.
  3. Turn in your completed record sheets to finish the project and to be eligible for 4-H fair exhibit.
Exhibit

*22"x 28" poster related to Chapter 1, 2, or 3.




 
Level:Veterinary Science 2 (grades 6-8)
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Read and complete county determined number of activities.
  2. Attend county workshops, when available.
  3. Turn in your completed record sheets to finish the project and to be eligible for 4-H fair exhibit.
Exhibit

22"x 28" poster, display, or quiz board related to chapter 1, 2, or 3.Display or Quiz board should be no larger than 36" x 36" x 36".




 
Level:Veterinary Science 3 (grades 9 - 12)
Last Modified: 10/04/05
Project Completion Recommendations
  1. Read and complete county determined number of activities.
  2. Attend county workshops, when available.
  3. Turn in your completed record sheets to finish the project and to be eligible for 4-H fair exhibit.
Exhibit

Develop and assemble a teaching aid. OR

Develop a project in conjunction with a veterinarian. Display the project with a report of the results, recommendations, findings, and conclusions.

OR

Write a one page outline of a workshop or demonstration you presented




Weather and Climate Science

Youth will learn basic information about weather and climate science, including what causes variations in weather and why we have different seasons and climates on the earth. In this project you will observe and record weather conditions and learn weather symbols.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the weather and climate project this year. Poster exhibits must be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28" foam-core board or poster board mounted on a firm backing, and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Notebook exhibits must be displayed in a standard three ring binder. Choose one of the options listed below, appropriate for your grade in school. Use an appropriate exhibit title. Be sure to include a label with your name, grade, 4-H club, and county in the lower right hand corner.

It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.



Requirements

 
Level:Level 1
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit
  • A poster related to an activity from the level 1 manual
  • A poster and/or notebook of a weather or climate related science experiment appropriate for grades 3-5



 
Level:Level 2:
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit

 

  • A poster related to an activity from the level 2 manual
  • A poster and/or notebook of a weather or climate related science experiment appropriate for grades 6-8



 
Level:Level 3:
Last Modified: 10/01/14
Exhibit

A poster related to an activity from the level 3 manual

A poster and/or notebook of a weather or climate related science experiment appropriate for grades 9-12

Independent Study -Learn all you can about a weather and/or climate topic, program, facility, project, etc. and present it on a poster or in a notebook. Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the works cited to describe what you did and what you learned.Title your poster or notebook, "Advanced Weather and Climate Science -Independent Study"

Mentoring -Exhibit a poster or notebook that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Advanced Weather and Climate Science -Mentor."




Weeds

What is in it for me?
Youth learn all about different types of weeds as well as life skills through fun hands-on experiences. The project is divided into three divisions:
Division 1
Division 2
Division 3
What can I learn?
In this project you will learn about weed identification, how to preserve weed samples, and how to mount your weed samples.
Exhibit Introduction


It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.


Requirements



 
Level:Division 1 (May do 1 to 2 years)
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Exhibit
  1. Collect and identify 15 different weeds from the common and/or invasive plants of Indiana. Your collection of weeds must be taken from the list of common weeds in publication 4-H 247-W. Be aware that some weeds may be more prevalent at different times of the year. Each specimen should show flower and/or fruit, leaf, stem, and root characteristics, all of which are necessary for complete and accurate identification.
  2. Press weeds (see page 4, 4-H 247-W).
  3. Mount each individual weed on 8 1/2" x 11" poster board by either taping or gluing the plant to the poster board
  4. Cover the poster board containing the plant specimen with cellophane or clear sheet plastic or put it in a plastic sheet protector. Place the pages in a three-ring binder (punch holes of adequate size to allow easy turning of the pages in the binder).
  5. Label (label size, 1 1/2" x 2") each weed as to:
  6. Name of weed (common and scientific names-remember to italicize or underline scientific names)
  7. Where found (lawn, garden, pasture, etc.)
  8. How it reproduces (seed and/or underground root parts)
  9. Answer questions on record sheet 4-H 247A-W, and put a copy of the record sheet in your notebook.
  10. In year two, exhibit a different set of weeds, not repeating the ones from year one.



 
Level:Division 2 (May do 1 to 2 years)
Last Modified: 10/10/08
Exhibit
  1. Collect and identify 5 noxious and five poisonous weeds of Indiana. Your collection of weeds must be taken from the list of noxious and poisonous weeds in publication 4-H 247-W. Be aware that some weeds may be more prevalent at different times of the year. Each specimen should show flower and/or fruit, leaf, stem and root characteristics, all of which are necessary for complete and accurate identification.
  2. Press weeds (see page 4, 4-H 247-W).
  3. Mount each individual weed on 8 1/2" x 11" poster board by either taping or gluing the plant to the poster board
  4. Cover the poster board containing the plant specimen with cellophane or clear sheet plastic or put it in a plastic sheet protector. Place the pages in a three-ring binder (punch holes of adequate size to allow easy turning of the pages in the binder).
  5. Label (label size, 1 1/2" x 2") each weed as to:
  6. Name of weed (common and scientific names--remember to italicize or underline scientific names)
  7. Where found (lawn, garden, pasture, etc.)
  8. How it reproduces (seed and/or underground root parts)
  9. Answer questions on record sheet 4-H 247B-W, and put a copy of the record sheet in your notebook.
  10. In year two, exhibit a different set of weeds, not repeating the ones from year one.



 
Level:Division 3 (May do multiple years)
Last Modified: 10/14/11
Exhibit
  1. Collect and identify 15 different weed seeds from mature plants from the list of common, noxious, or poisonous weeds in 4-H-217-W . Five of these weed seeds must be taken from the list of noxious weeds in 4-H 247-W. Be aware that some weeds may be more prevalent at different times of the year.
  2. Clean the seeds and separate from the fruit (See page 3 of 4-H 247-W).
  3. Place one tablespoon of the dried weed seeds in a plastic zippered bag.
  4. Mount the plastic bags on poster board (22" x 28"). Mounting must be made to exhibit the poster in a horizontal position. Place your name, county, and club name in the lower right corner of the poster.
  5. Label (label size, 1 1/2" x 2") each weed seed as to:
  6. Name of weed (common and scientific names--remember to italicize or underline scientific names)
  7. Where found (lawn, garden, pasture, etc.)
  8. Annual, biennial, or perennial.
  9. Answer questions on record sheet 4-H 247C-W, and attach a copy of the record sheet to the back of your poster.
  10. In each consecutive year, exhibit different seeds, not repeating the ones from the year before.



Wildlife

Observing and studying wildlife can provide a lifetime of enjoyment. This project will help you learn to identify wildlife, basic wildlife needs, and how wildlife interact with other wildlife and with people. At the advanced level you will learn how to create a wildlife habitat, wherever you live.
Exhibit Introduction

Create an exhibit that shows the public what you learned in the wildlife project this year. Exhibits must be displayed horizontally, sized 22" x 28", mounted on a firm backing (foam-core board or other), and covered in clear plastic or other transparent material. Be sure to include a label with your name, grade, and county. Choose one of the topics listed below, appropriate for your grade in school, and use that topic for your exhibit title, so the judges know which activity you completed. You can also use a creative sub-title if you wish. Note: You must choose a different activity each year, except for the Level D Wildlife Management Plan, which may be expanded upon in subsequent years.

  • List sources for images and information.


It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.


Requirements



 
Level:Level A Grade 3 (4-H 903, one State Fair per level)
Last Modified: 10/10/08
Exhibit

Section 5 activity - Color the poster and 12 featured species (4-H 903a). Cut out the animal pictures and place them on the poster in the habitat where you could expect to find them. Each animal should have a label identifying the animal and the habitat(s) it may be found in.




 
Level:Level A Grade 4 (one State Fair entry for Level A)
Last Modified: 09/27/05
Exhibit

Present what you learned, on a poster or in a notebook, from one of the following sections:

Section 7: How We Grow - Show how six of the 12 featured species grow by listing the name of the young and a picture of the adult animal (as in your manual). You may draw your pictures, copy the pages in your manual, ask at your Extension office for the animal pictures that come with the poster for 3rd graders (4-H 903a), or find pictures in a magazine, on the Internet, or from some other source.

Section 8: Food Chains - Show the six food chains from the activity in your book and identify what foods each animal eats. Put the animals in correct 'food chain' order. Use pictures from any source available to you: copy your manual, magazines, drawing, on the Internet, or from some other source

Sections 9 - 11: Bird Observations - Show your feeder or birdbath (draw or photo), tell where it is located and include a two-week tally sheet showing what bird activity you observed. If you observed a bird feeder, describe the types of food you used.




 
Level:Level B Grades 5 & 6 (4-H 904, one State Fair entry per level)
Last Modified: 10/01/12
Exhibit

Present the information, on a poster or in a notebook, given in one of the following:

Section 1: Habitats -Show good habitat and poor habitat for three of the 12 common Indiana wildlife species. You can use photographs; make your own drawings, etc.

Section 8: The Food Web - Present a food web using pictures you draw or find (magazines, online, etc.). Label the producers, consumers, decomposers, etc. Use wildlife found in Indiana.

Sections 9 - 12: Animal Adaptations - Show physical adaptations of three to five animals and list the purpose that the adaptation serves. For example, cracker beak for eating seeds; long legs for wading, heavy coat to withstand cold temperatures, etc. You may use your own drawings, pictures, from magazines or other sources, or copy the drawings from your manual. Use wildlife found in Indiana.




 
Level:Level C Grades 7 - 9 (4-H 905, one State Fair entry per level.)
Last Modified: 10/01/13
Exhibit

Present the information from one of the following sections on a poster or in a notebook: Use wildlife found in the United States.

Section 2: Signs of Wildlife - Activity 1-Show signs of wildlife activity by collecting animal tracks. You may exhibit your actual tracks or pictures of your tracks. Tracks may be displayed in an insect display box (18 x 24 inches), orientated horizontally.

Section 3: Habitat, Activity 1 - Show how the four wildlife habitat requirements are provided to a wild animal on an aerial photo or topographic map of an Indiana landscape. (from the Internet, a Soil and Water Conservation Office, County Engineer, or soil survey).

Section 3: Layering, Activity 4 - Show a horizontal layering scene for a wildlife setting. Explain how layering is used by wildlife in nature. You may sketch the pictures, take a photograph, find and label pictures from a magazine, etc. It is suggested that you use one ecosystem in your exhibit.

Section 4:
Wildlife by Numbers - Present one or more of the concepts from this section (carrying capacity & population dynamics & reproduction & critical life stages) to show fairgoers how animal population rates are affected.

Section 6: Who Manages Indiana Wildlife - choose one of the following:
Activity
1 - Design a new Indiana environmental license plate using native Indiana wildlife. Explain why you chose your design and give information about what the environmental license plate program is all about.
Activity 4 - Write a management plan for one of the species listed in this activity. Be sure to address all the items listed in the activity. Note: this work must be presented in a notebook, not on a poster.

Section 7: Careers - Profile a person who works with and for native Indiana wildlife (examples include, but are not limited to, IDNR, fish and wildlife, forestry, conservation officers, biologists, volunteers).Be sure to address all the items listed in the activity.




 
Level:Level D Grades 10 - 12 (4-H 906, one State Fair entry per level.)
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit

Present the information from one of the following sections on a poster or in a notebook: Focus on wildlife found in the United States.

Section 1: Wildlife Management, Activity 1 - Write a wildlife management plan. Include all the information requested in this section. You may present this topic multiple years if you include the following items:

  • Evaluate your first year's plan (what worked and what didn't).
  • Expand on your plan by adding land and/or species to be managed.

Section 1: Wildlife Management, Activity 2 - Outdoor lab - Present the development or improvement you did for an outdoor lab.

Section 2: Careers, Activities 3-5 - Learn what a career in wildlife is like by completing Activities 3-5 (job search, interview, & job shadowing). Present what you did and learned on a poster or in a notebook.

Section 3: Current Wildlife Topics, Activities 1-5 - Choose one of these activities and present what you did and learned. May only do this section one year.




 
Level:Independent Study: Grades 9 - 12, one State Fair entry
Last Modified: 10/15/09
Exhibit
  • Advanced topic - Learn all you can about a wildlife topic of your choice and present it on a poster.  Include a short manuscript, pictures, graphs, and list the references you used to describe what you did and what you learned. Title your poster, "Advanced Wildlife - Independent Study."
  • Mentoring - Exhibit a poster that shows how you mentored a younger 4-H member. Include your planning, the time you spent, the challenges and advantages of mentoring, and how the experience might be useful in your life. Photographs and other documentation are encouraged. Title your poster, "Advanced Wildlife - Mentor."



Wood Science

The 4-H wood sciences program provides youth with educational information about wood and how it can be used to construct items. The wood science project develops project skills (i.e., safe practices, using hand tools, using power tools, making specialized wood cuts) and life skills (i.e., decision-making, using science and technology, developing communication skills). These fun-filled, hands-on learning experiences are provided under the direction of caring adults.
Requirements

 
Level:Wood Science Level 1 (Grades 3-4)
Last Modified: 10/10/05
Project Completion Recommendations

Complete the activities as indicated in the manual or as specified by the County Extension Office.



It is recommended/suggested that all posters, notebooks, and display boards include a reference list indicating where information was obtained, giving credit to the original author, to complete the 4-H member’s exhibit. This reference list should/might include web site links, people and professionals interviewed, books, magazines, etc. It is recommended this reference list be attached to the back of a poster or display board, be the last page of a notebook, or included as part of the display visible to the public. A judge is not to discredit an exhibit for the manner in which references are listed or a lack thereof.

Exhibit
  • Exhibit one article made using the plans in the Level 1 manual (BU-6875) or the additional plans provided.
    Tools that pose limited safety concerns can be used to complete the exhibit.. Examples include: all hand tools, and power tools such as: power screwdriver, pad sander, cordless drill.

    Tools that pose greater potential for injuries should not be used. Examples include: table saw, router, band saw.
  • OR

  • Exhibit a poster on any topic covered in the Level 1 manual.



 
Level:Wood Science Level 2 (Grades 5-6)
Last Modified: 10/10/05
Project Completion Recommendations

Complete the activities as indicated in the manual or as specified by the County Extension Office.

Exhibit
  • Exhibit one article made according to the Level 2 manual (BU-6876) plans, additional plans, or one that uses the skills discussed in either Level 1 or 2. Tools that pose limited safety concerns can be used to complete the exhibit.. Examples include: all hand tools, and power tools such as: power screwdriver, pad sander, cordless drill
    Tools that pose greater potential for injuries should not be used. Examples include: table saw, router, band saw.
  • OR

  • Exhibit a poster on any topic covered in the Level 2 manual.



 
Level:Wood Science Level 3 (Grades 7-9)
Last Modified: 07/06/05
Project Completion Recommendations

Complete the activities as indicated in the manual or as specified by the County Extension Office.

Exhibit
  • Exhibit one article of your choice. The project should use only those skills and tools covered in Level 1, 2 and 3. (BU-6877)
  • OR
  • Exhibit a poster on any topic covered in the Level 3 manual.



 
Level:Wood Science Level 4 (Grades 10-12)
Last Modified: 07/06/05
Project Completion Recommendations

Complete the activities as indicated in the manual or as specified by the County Extension Office.

Exhibit
  • Exhibit one article of your choice. The project should use only those skills and tools covered in Levels 1, 2, 3 and 4.
  • OR

  • Exhibit a poster on any topic covered in the Level 4 manual.